The Website of Dr. Joseph P. Farrell



One of the major themes I've been following on this website, and indeed, in all of my books, is the impact of science and technology on history, culture, and society. And one of the largest cultural impacts would be the technologies of emulation, those which can emulate the stories of the gods of old. Within this category of emulational technologies, would surely fall those of longevity.

Now there's this from Harvard University:

Harvard scientists reverse the ageing process in mice, and it might also be safe for humans!

Granted, there are some great and beneficial goods to be had here:

"The surprise recovery of the animals has raised hopes among scientists that it may be possible to achieve a similar feat in humans or at least to slow down the ageing process.An anti-ageing therapy could have a dramatic impact on public health by reducing the burden of age-related health problems, such as dementia, stroke and heart disease, and prolonging the quality of life for an increasingly aged population."

Well and good, but let's ponder two important questions. In the first case, let's assume for a moment that this process is applicable to humans and that it would result in longevity effects. Who would have access to it under a federal "health" "care" system such as Obromney-Heritage Foundation care? And who would determine access? Mostly likely, only the very rich, or very powerful, could afford it, and be given access to it. It would therefore become perfectly feasible, under such a scenario, for the elite simply to live so long that their self-generated global population crisis would simply peter out... feed enough people GMOs that affect human virility and fertility, and you get the idea... no drastic biowarfare, starvation, genocide, or nuclear warfare needed. It would be a "soft genocide," easily executable, and easily explained, and, because not sharp or harsh, seemingly the perfect vehicle to accomplish an objective the financial oligarchy has held since the idea of "overpopulation" and "maximum carrying capacity" was first broached in the Most Serene Republic of Venice. One would literally be looking at a breakaway civilization in the most fundamental sense, for it would break away simply by outliving its "normal" human counterpart. No drastic measures needed. Just price the technology beyond the average population's ability to afford, or deny access under government regulations for one contrived bureaucratic reason or another.

But there's a second question to ponder, and that is - for want of a better expression - the "principle of public lag time." To put it succinctly, it is taken by alternative researchers as an axiom of black projects development that what is developed secretly may be at least a decade, if not several, in advance of what is publicly known in that science, or what is technologically capable to it. But we should not restrict our vision of possibilities merely to physics and secret accomplishments in aerospace propulsion and technology.

As I attempt to argue in my forthcoming book Covert Wars and Breakaway Civilizations, the funding mechanism for this structure is truly vast, and far exceeds even the estimated numbers of the "legitimate" black budget, which is staggering in and of itself. This funding mechanism was, as the title suggests, partly created to fund covert wars, but this does not account for all the vast sums implied. A technological development is implied.

It stands to reason that much of this hidden finance went to fund projects of biological and genetic research. In short, what we are learning about now - in mice - may have already been accomplished in black laboratories of governments or rich patrons long ago... and that may be a hidden reason for the race to patent all sorts of artificially engineered or tinkered-with genomes, much less to socialize medical care in almost every country in the world...

When this man gave this speech, he was ninety-two years old:

I don't know about you, but it makes me wonder!

See you on the flip side.



Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and "strange stuff". His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into "alternative history and science".

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