archaeology

Are there theological as well as military implications of your ...

February 12, 2008 By Giza Developer
    I think there are, in a broad sense. In fact, there weould seem to be so many that to summarize them here would be next to impossible, but perhaps one can appreciate some of these implications by looking at two sets of implications more or less unique to our western culture. On the one hand, ancient Egyptian religion is almost unique in the sense that it had a profound belief not only in immortality, but in immortality of a very PHYSICAL sort. In this, the only other parallel one finds with a similarly strong emphasis on physical aspects of immortality is Christianity. In the latter case, however, the reasons for the belief are well known. There is an historical account of them.

    But with ancient Egypt, once again, we are confronted by a fully fledged very advanced civilization with a similarly advanced and complex religion that springs up out of nowhere. So the question is: does their religion ALSO spring from some even more ancient and more advanced precursor civilization?

    On the other hand, if we look, for example, to the Old Testament, the curious references to the "nephilim" in Genesis 6 clearly point to some sort of "genetic mingling" between humanity and fallen angels, producing a race of "giants" that we're all familiar with, e.g., the story of David and Goliath. Other civilizations preserve similar stories of an ancient time when "gods" walked the earth and intervened in the affairs of men, and fought their wars, often with very horrific weapons, as any reading of the ancient Hindu epics will clearly reveal.

    Suffice it to say that I do think there are such implications. I briefly explored them in The Giza Death Star Deployed, and hope to do so more fully in a third and final book, to complete a Giza Death Star "trilogy."