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CONFERENCE IMPRESSIONS

June 3, 2009 By Giza Developer

Well apologies to all for such a long absence! I've tried to keep up with posting comments, even negative ones (like the one from Frank Marshal on a whopper of a grammatical error I made in "Will the Real Adolf Hitler Please Die?" I have to admit, when I read his comment, I had to laugh at myself. But honestly folks, could we be a BIT more polite when offering criticisms or corrections? I'm reminded of the story that during World War Two, when an outraged English teacher complained to Prime Minister Churchill that he always ended his sentences with prepositions, that his response was, "That is something up with which I shall not put."

Anyway, that said, I thought I'd share some comments about the Secrets Conference in Tempe, Arizona(November, 2008), the International UFO Conference in Laughlin, Nevada (February 2009), and the Ozark UFO Conference in Eureka Springs (April, 2009).  All of these were very well organized and professionally run affairs, so my thanks and hats off to all of them for being such well run events. I had the good pleasure and honor of meeting Mr. Timothy Good at the Ozark conference, seeing and hearing Richard Hoagland at the Secrets Conference, and a nice response from the audience in Laughlin.  Additionally I had the honor of meeting Robert O. Dean at Laughlin, and of meeting my good friend Jim Marrs in person there for the first time, and having some good private conversation with him.

There were some unusual episodes, all of which took place at the Laughlin conference. One well known ufologist, whose name shall remain unknown, stopped by my book booth, and looked down at me with a look of mild disdain on his face. Without so much as introducing himself or offering his hand, he simply said, "You really don't think the Nazis are behind all UFO sightings do you?"

I responded "Of course not." 

"That's good," he replied. He then went on to lecture me that it was one thing to have all the theory down, and another to have the engineering behind it. Furthermore, he declared, he knew all of this because of his engineering background working in black projects. I patiently tried to explain that I had tried to address precisely these issues in my books, an explanation which was met with something between a "hmm" and a grunt. With that - again with no introductions, no pleasantries or even a "Well it was nice talking to you," the famous ufologist pivoted on his heels and marched off to his own book booth.

The second episode at the Laughlin conference occurred after my presentation, when yet another famous ufologist cornered me and asked me "Couldn't the Nazis have back-engineered a UFO to obtain their incredible Bell technology?" or words to that effect. After a long sigh of exasperation from me, I explained that I did not think that was possible. I was then informed that they had indeed recovered a crashed UFO in the Black Forest. I responded - my patience running out - that I had attempted to investigate this well-known allegation, and could find no solid substantiation of it. My interrogator then brought up the issue of Mussolini's secret UFO study group, and I interrupted him, and explained that if he had bothered to read my books, he would have known that I mentioned it in Reich of the Black Sun, but that I still did not think it necessary to invoke ET or crashed UFOs to explain the Nazi Bell, or the physics behind it. I must confess, my impatience for this whole line of "explanation" is growing thin, for it seems that the true believers in the UFO community will credit humanity with almost no scientific creativity or technological inventiveness without the technologically superior ETs ineptly crashing their technologically superior UFOs onto our planet to be back engineered by our own mentally deficient scientists and engineers. And I stated all of this - in almost exactly those words - to my interlocutor, adding that, at this rate, we'd have to start crashing our own secret technologies on ET's home world, so they could catch back up with us.

In a nutshell, the Laughlin conference was what I expected it to be: a smoothly run convention, with well-known names, but, unfortunately, with a strong representation of the "true believer" of the dogmatic type in attendance, the true believer who defends and maintains his position with all the force of a papal encyclical. 

 The Ozark Conference in Eureka Springs turned out to be a pleasant surprise in the wake of the Laughlin experience, for while I met and had much good conversation with "true believers" at this conference, by and large, I was struck by the fact that most of them were far more open to alternative explanations to their own alternative explanations.

To boil it all down, I was pleasantly surprised by the overall experience. I had come to each conference expecting to see more of the "dogmatic" type of "true believer" than I actually encountered, and this was, to me, good news. In conversations with Timothy Good, Robert O. Dean, and others - with the exceptions noted above - I found the general tenor to be "committed, but inquiring," and open to other possibilities.

Again, my thanks to all the conference organizers for making my experience as a speaker at their events both fun and stimulating.