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JAPAN ASKS FOR NUCLEAR HELP: AN INTERMISSION FROM APOCALYPSE THEATER, ...

April 5, 2011 By Joseph P. Farrell

Well, one of the latest stories out of Japan is this: TEPCO, the electrical company that built and maintained the nuclear plant to in the news lately, is pleading for nuclear workers from around the world to help it put out the reactor fires and stem the disaster:

Exclusive: WANTED: U.S. workers for crippled Japan nuke plant

OK...fine, but then there's this:

TEPCO and Texas Nuclear Power Project

And this:

TEPCO and Texas Nuclear Power, NASDAQ report

Now...wait a minute! Say what!?  Huh!? Rewind and play that again!? This is the same company that (1) built a nuclear power plant in an earthquake zone (2) built it on the shore in a tsunami-prone area of the country instead of on higher ground, (3) built it behind a 20-25 seawall (remember those tsunamis?) and (4) had a long and dubious safety and maintenance track record.

And this is the company that was going to be involved in a nuclear power plant project on the Texas coast!?!?!?  OK, now, c'mon you guys that are scripting this apocalypse theater, surely you can do better! Why not enter into a partnership with Thyssen-Krupp, British Petroleum, and TEPCO for a truly apocalyptic Gulf-of-Mexico scenario? Why, would could have a radioactive oil spill (lasting months) and a veritable cornucopia of news stories hyping up fear and helplessness.

Well, my point is humorous, but the situation - whether there is any scripting or not - is hardly laughable. We need look no further than to the fact that one petroleum company nearly ruined (and some say it did), the Gulf of Mexico and the livelihoods of thousands of people, and another nuclear energy company has such a disastrous safety record that it had to pull out of a deal in Texas - a deal, I hasten to remind everyone, might have gone through had not the tragedy in Japan occurred.

Face it, these corporations are a menace. It is time for a Manhattan Project to research alternative energy forms and new theories to produce them. It is time for a public debate - a prolonged and persistent presence in the public mind that we need such research and need to insist upon it.

Otherwise, we are left with this tragi-comedy, this farce, of corporate elites that do not know what the hell they're doing.