Banksters

THE JAPANESE BEARER BOND SCANDAL: A COMMENT FROM MR. BENJAMIN FULFORD

May 3, 2011 By Joseph P. Farrell

Well, I am astounded in one way and no so in another, for the Japanese Bearer Bond story continues to draw attention and commentary, and this time, from no less a noteworthy than Mr. Benjamin Fulford, who kindly posted the following comment on this site, and I thought everyone here should be made aware of it, for he provides two very interesting bits of information. Here is what Mr. Fulford stated:

"Akihiko Yamaguchi and Mr. Watanabe were both released because they had diplomatic passports. The bonds were illegally seized by the Italian P2 Freemasonic Lodge. I have met Yamaguchi, Watanabe and most members of the P2 Lodge. This whole case is part of a battle for control of the dollar and euro printing machine being raged between two factions. Japan was attacked with an sea-bed nuclear tsunami triggering device as a part of this battle. There is no need to invoke the paranormal. Foundation X is the same people who stole the bonds who were trying (without luck) to cash them via Lord James. If you want to know the whole story (I am directly involved) feel free to contact me."

I am deeply grateful to Mr. Fulford for resolving one issue that most of us here have wanted to know: the identities of the two men that were apprehended by the Guadia di Finanza. What really intrigues me about Mr. Fulford's comment is the rest of the information contained:

(1) That there is a connection between this scandal and the notorious P-2 Lodge scandal; and

(2) That the gentlemen were connected to a Foundation X trying to cash the bonds via Lord James.

What intrigues me immensely is the stated connection to P-2. Loge Propaganda Due was a masonic lodge founded by the Italian "businessman" Licio Gelli. As most here know, it eventually became so powerful that it numbered  in its roles members of the Italian government and military, its security and intelligence services, its Carboniari and other law enforcement agencies (and therefore one can only assumed some members within its financial police services), and the Vatican. There were, moreover, connections to Banco Ambrosiano and the whole Roberto Calvi Affair, and murky ties to Michele Sindona, and so on. Virtually every banking scandal in the 1970s and very early 80s had some connection, howsoever tenuous, with the P-2 affair. The lodge was eventually shut down - or so we are told - by the Italian government in the early 1980s, and its leader, Licio Gelli, fled to.... hold on and sit down now.... Argentina, where the lodge had also been active.

Now, before everyone writes Mr. Fulford's comments off here, on the basis of the lodge having been shut down long before the Bearer Bonds scandal, what intrigued me about what he stated are the implications.

Let us assume for the sake of argument that it is true that there was some connection. This would imply that the P-2 lodge and the parallel government that it represented continued in some form after its official disbanding. This would to some extent fit my own dot-connecting, in that I suggested we were looking perhaps at a funding mechanism of some sort for a breakaway civilization, or that we were looking at an operation designed to send deliberate messages by "Someone A" to "Someone B."And it is not really difficult to imagine P-2 surviving in some form; such is par for the course for such organizations.

And I don't need to remind readers of my site the significance of Gelli fleeing to Argentina, which at that time was in the hands of a right-wing military junta that, to a great degree, could be described as Peronist. And of course, there is that "other organization" with a heavy presence in Argentina that my readers know all too well... In that regard, let it be stated here that Licio Gelli's politics were - well, to put it bluntly - fascist.

Is this pure speculation on my part? Of course it is. But I must admit, the idea intrigues me, and I thought this information to be significant enough to bring to everyone's attention. For the moment, I reserve judgment, but I think we should all be grateful for having some information on the identities of the gentlemen apprehended by the Guardia di Finanza.