conspiracy

SOME MORE THINGS TO MAKE YOU GO “HMMM…”: INSLAW AND ...

February 3, 2012 By Joseph P. Farrell

A couple of weeks ago I blogged about the Inslaw Affair and the mysterious death of Gus Weiss and a little known espionage episode called the Farewell Dossier:

DAVE MARTIN, THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF GUS WEISS, AND INSLAW Read more: DAVE MARTIN, THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF GUS WEISS, AND INSLAW - Giza Death Star Community

A LITTLE UPDATE ON THE INSLAW MATTER

Recently I finished reading a fascinating fascinating book on The Farewell Dossier by Sergei Kostin and Eric Raynaud, documenting this little-known triumph of French counter-intelligence running one of the most successful moles in intelligence history, Col. Vladimir Ippolitovich Vetrov, inside the KGB during the early years of the administration of Ronald Reagan and the government of French President Francois Mitterand. The book, Farewell: the Greatest Spy Story of the Twentieth Century, reads like a Robert Ludlum or John Le Carre espionage thriller, save for the fact that it is all true.

Vetrov, a disenchanted KGB officer disillusioned with the failures of the Soviet system as a whole, and with what he perceived as KGB dysfunctionality in particular, approached French counter-intelligence with the offer to give them extremely sensitive KGB information, including files documenting the devastating extent of Soviet industrial-technological espionage within the West, espionage that essentially provided the Soviet Union with the technology it needed to maintain technological parity with the West which it could not otherwise have done on its own.French counter-intelligence, which had no experience or even human agents within the Soviet Union, readily appreciated the plum that had fallen into its lap, and counter-intelligence chief Marcel Chalet quickly agreed to run the mole, to whom he assigned the codename "Farewell".

As the book makes clear, Mitterand requested a private meeting with Reagan, and shared the good news, and eventually the French cache of information Vetrov was supplying was shared with American intelligence and the Pentagon. At this point, one of Reagan's key advisers, Gus Weiss, conceived the idea to use the KGB's own "shopping list" for advanced computer programs against it, and thus software intended to monitor and regulate a key gas pipeline was infected with a virus. At first, the software worked perfectly, but later the virus was activated, which led to a 3 kiloton explosion in the pipeline.(Farewell, The Greatest Spy Story of the Twentieth Century, p. 283). Of course, the implication here is that this was not the only infected software that was either sold to the Soviet Union, or which the West allowed to be "stolen" by the KGB. The book even strongly suggests that the whole Red Mercury scare of the 1990s may have begun as a CIA deception connected with the Farewell dossier (pp. 286-287).

What this whole story implies is something deep and profound, for it is a story of doctored software that was being done at precisely the same time that similar allegations surfaced surrounding Inslaw Corporation's database management software, PROMIS, so to my mind, there is a high probability that the Farewell matter and the Inslaw matter are deeply connected.

But there is an even deeper implication and I hope it's apparent: such sophisticated software management programs with backdoors and viruses brought down an entire system - Soviet Communism - without firing a single shot, and that software is/was in the hands of the US government and its various intelligence agencies. Now imagine similar such software - in the control of these government agencies and possibly any "rogue group" or faction within them - being installed in, say, banks like Chase Manhattan, the Bank of International Settlements, or - just for kicks - the Rothschild Nemrod Fund, or the Bank of Crooks and Criminals...er...I meant, the Bank of Credit and Commerce International, Nugan Hand, Barings (names I'm sure some of you will recognize), or the Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, Credite Suisse, or the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Transer (SWIFT) and you get the idea...

.... maybe, just maybe, the banksters aren't in as much control as they'd like to think? Maybe it's more of a two-way street between the government and the high financial elite than the banksters would have us believe?