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RUSSIA WARNS WEST, MASSES TROOPS IN GEORGIA

May 7, 2012 By Joseph P. Farrell

There an article in Business Insider that a friend of mine, Mr. P.T., brought to my attention, and this one is worth pondering from several angles:

Russia Is Massing Troops On Iran's Northern Border And Waiting For A Western Attack Read more: http://articles.businessinsider.com/2012-04-09/news/31311454_1_russian-defense-ministry-military-action-dmitry-rogozin#ixzz1tHvANv00

This is interesting, as I said, from any number of perspectives, but let's consider the two main ones: Russia's internal politics, and external relations. From the standpoint of Russia's internal situation, clearly Rogozin's appointment after the re-election of Vladimir Putin to the Russian presidency, means that, once again, Russia simply is not going to play ball according to the likes, wishes, wants, and dictats, of Washington, London, and Tel Aviv. It is, in other words, a signal of wider and more ambitious Russian "blockage" of Western "interests". We can fully expect that this will signal an increasing "Russia for Russia" policy.

But the external relationships here are even more intriguing. As I blogged previously in several video blogs these past few days, if the Eurozone unravels, one can expect, as a matter of national and economic inevitability, that Germany will gravitate more and more toward Russia simply as a matter of protecting its energy supplies. We needn't worry that the Germans will be come wholly reliant on Russia, but, it would signal a tighter relationship than is even ow the case. Russia can be expected not only to resist western pressures for direct action against Iran, but can also therefore be expected to cement stronger ties with India, China, Brazil, and other nations increasingly disenchanted with the West.

Then there's one final comment:

"The influential Russian Nezavisimaya Gazeta newspaper has quoted a Russian military source as saying that the situation forming around Syria and Iran 'causes Russia to expedite the course of improvement of its military groups in the South Caucasus, the Caspian, Mediterranean and Black Sea regions.'"

Reading between the lines a bit here, this translates into "We are going to need to upgrade our entire military" with new weapons and capabilities... in short, we're also staring a new arms race in the face, and this time, it is the West, and not Russia, that cannot afford it.