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ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE ON THE SNOWDEN AFFAIR

My co-author on Transhumanism: A Grimoire of Alchemical Agendas, Dr. Scott D. deHart, sent me this one, and it merits sharing here and some commentary:

NSA Whistleblower: NSA Spying On – and Blackmailing – Top Government Officials and Military Officers

Before getting to the article itself, I want to recall an incident that, to this day, I find extraordinarily curious and more than disturbing. This was the state dinner that President Obama hosted for the then visiting Indian Prime Minister, Mr. Singh, in his first term. You might recall that there was a story - a strange one to be sure - that quickly appeared and then, just as quickly, was forgotten as it dropped off the radar screen of the lamestream media like a jet fighter in a power dive; this was the story that the state dinner for the Prime Minister had been crashed by two uninvited guests, who managed to get into the dinner. At the time, and to this day, I thought that an extraordinary lapse of security... and to this day, I think it was a not-so-subtle-message being sent to Mr. Obama. After all, he is a family man, with children. The message? "Do as we say, because we can get to you at any time."  Don't get me wrong, I have no love lost for the President's policies, but there was no other way to my mind to interpret  such an extraordinary lapses of security.

Now comes this article, that apparently there are organized groups within various intelligence agencies doing "Data Mining" - a polite euphemism for spying - on top officials, bureaucrats, military personnel - and a then sitting Senator from Illinois who had presidential aspirations. In case you missed it, here's Tice on his spying:

"Tice: Okay. They went after–and I know this because I had my hands literally on the paperwork for these sort of things–they went after high-ranking military officers; they went after members of Congress, both Senate and the House, especially on the intelligence committees and on the armed services committees and some of the–and judicial. But they went after other ones, too. They went after lawyers and law firms. All kinds of–heaps of lawyers and law firms. They went after judges. One of the judges is now sitting on the Supreme Court that I had his wiretap information in my hand. Two are former FISA court judges. They went after State Department officials. They went after people in the executive service that were part of the White House–their own people. They went after antiwar groups....

"One of the papers that I held in my hand was to wiretap a bunch of numbers associated with, with a 40-something-year-old wannabe senator from Illinois. You wouldn’t happen to know where that guy lives right now, would you? It’s a big white house in Washington, DC. That’s who they went after. And that’s the president of the United States now."

In other words, from an altogether different quarter, a bit of confirmation of my "state-dinner-intentional-security-lapse" scenario.

Consider the implications here: if it be possible to find "dirt" on someone via such data mining - and admit it, who doesn't have dirt? - then one might run for office in either political party, with the best of intentions, but, having attained it, been confronted with the proverbial manilla envelope through the mail slot in the front door, full of pictures, transcripts, what have you, with a polite note informing you on how to vote on this or that piece of legislation, "or else."

What the Snowden affair, the IRS affair, and similar scandals seem to be indicating is that there may very well be hidden reasons, deep within rogue groups that have seized control of the intelligence agencies that compose the national security apparatus, that are responsible for the growing non-responsiveness of government at the national level. And what is true here is most likely true in other western countries. How can elected officials do their job, and remain responsible to their public constituencies, if in fact they are beholden to hidden and occulted constituencies of an entirely different nature?

The terrible prospect raised by such questions are that the national security establishment could, under such circumstances, be capable of working against the national security.

In previous blogs I have raised such questions, not the least of which is that such capabilities also introduce intelligence groups as hidden players - with enormous capabilities - in the financial and currency markets, able to manipulate vast quantities of money and cash flow in the ultimate insider trading scenarios.

The bottom line?

I suspect that more and more of these types of scandals will break, and that what we've seen thus far is merely the tip of a very large iceberg. What worries me now, almost as much as the scandals themselves, is the backlash that might occur because of them.

See you on the flip side.

16 thoughts on “ANOTHER PERSPECTIVE ON THE SNOWDEN AFFAIR”

  1. as wonderful commentators Kita and Margaret both posted below the rabitt hole is incredibly deep- if I my be allowed to add something to this: although I haven’t yet read the Nick Bryant/John deCamp books on the Franklin scandal Kerry Cassidy’s interview with de Camp on this subject is very good
    (let’s not get into a discussion about Cassidy, ok?) available on her website-

    deCamp was the first one to write about this- Bryant followed-

    but for a diluted version (if one can stomach even this) just go to YouTube and type “Conspiracy of Silence” made for Britain’s Discovery Chanel to get the unedited, poor video/sound quality of this (edited versions were destroyed- gosh!)-

    but in my opinion the Franklin Cover-Up can’t even compare to Cathy Obrien’s testimonies in her “Trance Formation of America”- talk about “if you can stomach it”-

    stay well all- regards-

    Larry in Germany

  2. There are many levels to the “games” being played. On a macro level, “we” have a privatization of anything in the public sphere. One of those is the governments spying agencies. These have, in large part, been corporatized. The private corporations set up their own spy rings inside(for example) the Defense Dept, while everyone around you was peddling arms, they were peddling raw intelligence(says whistleblower): straight from the shelf, direct to buyer, no stops between unpun, untested, unpasteurized and above all untouched by bureaucratic hands.
    The whistleblowers fight for their country, not for the #@*!ing multinationals with their offshore bank accounts!
    The Deep State, has an ever-expanding circle of non/governmental insiders from banking, industry, & commerce cleared for highly classified info denied to large swaths of Congress & the White House & other govt. agencies.
    The policing of the whistleblowers isn’t the solution; their the problem.

    1. The policing of information warriors like Snowdon isn’t the solution; the police are the problem.
      Remember Manning was held in solitary confinement for 23 hours per day and forced to sleep naked and sheetless, in conditions even a military judge called excessive.
      The insane asylum rewards the criminals/traitors and punishes the patriots.
      nd all the while, “our” renown 4th estate, prioritizes the ethnic racial slurs of tv-cooks hosts, ect., ect.

  3. I have heard there is a old Chinese saying you kill the chicken to scare the monkey. Jesse Ventura take on this was the elected president Barack Obama was shown the Zapruder film from Dealey Plaza the untapered version to put him in his place. As for spying and blackmailing public officials to control them that is as old as time immemorial.

  4. I remember, I was in London about 8 years ago, reading “the torygraph”, a small column appeared inside the paper. It told us that UK had a big incall center, about 1.600 emplyees in the Midlands, that was listening to phone calls in US. Visa versa, US had a similar incall center that was listening to phone calls in UK. The reason for this “construction”, no one of the listeners were breaking any domestic laws the article said.

    Also, at the same time I was reading one of the books of John Simpson, a journalist and editor of BBC. He told us, that when journalists were typing “ antigovernment” ( this was during the Blair reign) articles which content should be aired the next day, the editor of the department where the journalist was working, typing, could get a phone call from Downing Street complaining about the issues in the article before it was aired.

    I agree to your notion, dr. Farrell, that one of most important aspect of the surveillance is to control the bureaucratic, political and financial class. We had an example here in Norway two years ago, where retired police officers (employed by a foreign agency, guess who?) were involved in surveillance in the hearth of Oslo, 300 m from our financial center, 400 m from the royal castle, 800 m from our parliament and 1.000 from the head quarter of our government. They were exposed totally naked by an investigating television team (TV2). People were outraged. But, one week after 22/7, they were exonerated by our Chief of Justice; they were not spying, they were making observation…… It evaporated.

    The other aspect is the mining of Facebook and Twitter, and e.g. visiting dubious websides of wouldbes for the bureaucratic, political and financial class. Some of the content of the postings could be embarrassing for their future career, and thereby being exposed to blackmailing.

    But this datamining can turn ugly. If those evils find out to that in some countries we have to make a Cambodia solution, destroy the educated people, well, there you have it.

    1. Hi Dag,

      speaking of surveillance in Norway how much “listening” was being done to Anders Brevik connecting him to Neo-Nazi groups before the hideous and incredibly tragic Utoya incident, although I still tend to believe Brevik was a mind-controlled patsy a la Lee Harvey Oswald and probably had nothing whatsoever to do with the incident- but he was being ‘surveilled’ beforehand (if reports are true)- one must remember the first reports of the Utoya tragedy contained much info about multiple shots coming from all sides of the island at the same time- but these reports were swept under the carpet immediately- I could go on and on about what I think about Norway’s role in the NWO (as if many would really care) but will desist-

      in any case you live in an exquisitely beautiful country (was there for a few days in ’68) and as a professional musician I must confess as a romantically-inclined slob Edvard Grieg is one of my favorite composers (“Peer Gynt” suite aside)-

      please stay well- regards-

      Larry in Germany

      1. Hi, Larry.
        I was not aware of your comment until two days ago.

        About the 22/7 event in Norway. I have a background as a former crisis manager on an industrial plant. In one case I was in charge and in another case, I was part of the team. And those were serious events. When the crisis happen and you are in charge, you act. By the information that you allocate extra resources immediately are called in and dispersed in a priority of your judgement. You do what you think is necessary.

        Whatching on TV that late day and afternoon what was playing out, I was appalled by the inactiveness of those in charge, and I am not alone. Later this has been one of the main criticism of the event. Why were those in charge so incapable to act?

        The government put up a group to investigate “the whole thing”. When the report was published, a vast portion of it was classified; the people of Norway was not allowed to know the full story. And the full content will be kept under the rug for 50 years.

        Well, I remember, as a kid, we were playing “hide and run” on a mature hay field. We were more or less destroying the local farmer´s ability to harvest the field. The day after, he went up to my face, I became embarrassed, and he said only – sooner or later the truth will be out in the open, you can account on that. That was all what he was saying.

        Let me leave it there, maybe I am under the turf when the whole truth is appearing.

        BTW, about 20 years ago we spent a week in July with another couple in the Mosel valley. It was a tremendous week, a memory for life, wine stock fields along the river, nice people. We stayed at a hotel in Traben Trarbach. We went onboard the riverboat and I think we went upstreams to Trier. Since then, I fill my roemische cups (bought there) with some good wines from Mosel in late warm summer evenings.

        All the Best “down there”,
        Dag

        1. hey, Dag, many thanks for your reply- very appreciated- I hope you continue to be well-

          I was hoping you would respond to my posting because I really respect your already posted viewpoints and because the hideous Utoya incident made such an indelible impression on my mind/psyche and remains one of my “collective” heart-felt unanswered questions (not to mention my heart goes out to the victims and their families)-

          “The government put up a group to investigate “the whole thing”. When the report was published, a vast portion of it was classified; the people of Norway was not allowed to know the full story. And the full content will be kept under the rug for 50 years”-

          I don’t doubt any of this- what I never understood is (according to my read reports) why the Oslo police (they have helicopters if my read sources are correct) chose to go to Utoya in a boat that was suddenly “leaky” and then had to abbandon the effort!-

          I guess there’s a reason why this has to be “rugged” for 50 yrs.- and I stick to my guns in believing that Anders Brevik was a patsy, like Lee Harvey Oswald-

          on anther topic: forget Trier and the Ahr valley- come to my area in SW Germany for the best food, beers, wine in Germany; we’re right on the border of the Alsace in France; it’s the best of two worlds: a mixture of the the best food/drink you can imagine-

          anyway, Dag, enough for now- please take care in gorgeous Norge (and gorgeous it is)- many regards-

          Larry in Germany

          1. Hi Larry
            .
            Thank you for your nice comment. Maybe we are a bit off the subject of this thread. The editor have to excuse us for our excursion.

            I have never been that south in Germany.

            When the growing season is over in the beginning of September and my project of short travelled food is finished, there is a possibility that I will jump into my car, go onboard the ferry to Kiel and heading to the south of Germany.

            The temptation what you suggest; to have some relaxing experiences that could feed my body, and brain (architecture and culture) can be very well likely an option for this month.

            Stay well this summer,
            Dag

  5. This brings to mind the many times I’ve heard Catherine Austin Fitts talk about “control files”. She’s done some eye-opening Solari reports with guests who have investigated, for instance, the Franklin scandal. She interviewed Nick Bryant who authored a very good book on Franklin. Read it only if you have a strong stomach. The interview is excellent – and available to subscribers. I’ve also heard him interviewed other places on the Internet.

    In case anyone doesn’t know what the Franklin scandal was about, it was the buying and selling of children, mostly from the Omaha, Nebraska area, for the purposes of sex slavery, among other things.

    It’s almost as if there’s an industry or specialty in compromising political people in order to create these files which are then brought to bear. And make no mistake, this tactic has been used for a very long time.

    It certainly changes how you look at what goes on in government when you know about such things. Suddenly inexplicable decisions, etc., make sense.

    1. Thanks Kita for resurrecting that scandal, lest we forget! What makes it even sadder is that Boys Town, a foster care home, was a source for many of the victims. Webster Tarpley examined this scandal at length in his book ‘George Bush:  The Unauthorized Biography’. For folks who don’t have access to CAF’s Solari reports, a search online for ‘Chapter 21 Omaha’ from that book is readily found. And as you well advise … read only if you have a strong stomach!

  6. quote: “The terrible prospect raised by such questions are that the national security establishment could, under such circumstances, be capable of working against the national security.”

    Such was the case of Julia Davis, national security whistleblower, who was accused of being a “domestic terrorist” because she tried to report a serious breach of security. Instead of investigating her report, DHS relentlessly pursued and harassed her and her husband with for years. Like Snowden, the Davis’s are heroes. A must-listen at Red Ice Radio:
    Julia & BJ Davis – Hour 1 & 2 – Top Priority: The Terror Within
    http://www.redicecreations.com/radio/2013/05/RIR-130526.php

    and …

    “Obama’s ‘Insider Threat’ Program: Discourages Whistleblowing, Treats Leaking as Aiding the Enemy”
    http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/2013/06/21/obamas-insider-threat-program-discourages-whistleblowing-treats-leaking-as-aiding-the-enemy/

    The pathologists have risen to the top and rule at all levels! Controlling by fear … snitchers are rewarded, whistleblowers are their victims. It seems that the biggest threats to “national security” are the domestic terrorists within the government!

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