cosmic war

“WE TASTE BAD”: HUNT FOR ET SPACECRAFT BEGINS

August 9, 2013 By Joseph P. Farrell

Well...now it's "official," they're really looking for extraterrestrial spacecraft:

Hunt for alien spacecraft begins, as planet-spotting scientist Geoff Marcy gets funding Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/hunt-for-alien-spacecraft-begins-as-planetspotting-scientist-geoff-marcy-gets-funding-20130724-2qibc.html#ixzz2arsAm6Ak

This whole article "bothers" me for a variety of reasons, not the least of them being "You mean, you're only getting around to it now!?" We've had decades of UFO research (and suppression) since World War Two, decades of black projects, plus all those strange things we've already found "out there", including weird picture of Saturn's moon Iapetus that look like George Lucas' "death star" from Star Wars, weird behavior from Mars' moon Phobos, and, well, a catalog of "strange stuff" on that planet. So in this article we have the usual rehearsal of "serious" science, including Dyson spheres and a search for extraterrestrial spacecraft around planets not even in this solar system.

But I suspect this is the cover story, for the real story may be contained in these paragraphs:

Kepler has been wildly successful in its four years. To date, it has found 132 exoplanets - that is, planets outside our solar system - and possibly 3216 more that await confirmation. Researchers have extrapolated from Kepler data that our Milky Way galaxy alone contains at least 100 billion exoplanets, as many planets as there are stars. Still, with the telescope - which is 40 million miles from Earth - having collected data on 150,000 star systems, researchers are only beginning to pick through all the information.

Now, as the article goes on to suggest, they are currently writing programs to sift through all this mountain of data to find pull things that need closer human scrutiny.
This, I suspect, is the hidden admission, for such programs, with some adjustments, might be capable of sifting through the enormous mountains of data from our own solar system, and I suspect that's what the game is all about. ET may be much closer to home than we would wish, and given the historical records and ancient lore, perhaps it's not a bad idea to flash the message, "we taste bad." As for the Fermi paradox, those ancient records suggest something else, the Earth, and indeed, maybe the whole solar system, is a quarantine zone, a kind of galactic "demilitarized" zone, a post-Versailles Rheinland.
But that part of the story has to await Covert Wars and The Clash of Civilizations.
See you on the flip side.