Babylon's Bankers

SPANISH PROTESTS SHUT DOWN 55 BANKS, VENICE VOTES TO SECEDE

It has been some time since we've heard about the rape of southern Europe by the banksters, so I am grateful to Ms. M.W. for sharing this article, for there are serious protests in Spain concerning that country's BBVA bank's evictions of families from their homes:

Stop the Evictions: 55 Banks occupied March 24, 2014

Whatever the soundness (or more likely, the lack thereof) of Spain's easy money policies and "social democracy" policies were that led to that nation's continuing struggle, the fact remains that there are three guilty parties. Whenever governments promise things to its peoples that it ultimately cannot deliver, that implicates the peoples themselves(America, take note!). But the major players, the major responsibility, lies not just with "the people" but with the governments and capitalists, who for their own reasons, profit both from the easy credit and the misery to follow, and some Spaniards, like some Americans, know this. But thus far, the bankers themselves have all but avoided any jail time(except in Iceland of course), for their complicity in driving a meltdown.

So why am I drawing your attention to Spain?

It is because it is symptomatic of a growing problem in Europe, one that has spread from Greece, to Italy, to Spain, to Portugal, and I suspect will shortly break out in France. The growing disunion of the European Union has also spread to Italy, where Venice - in a rather dramatic touch of irony - has held a referendum where the city and region voted to secede from Italy and restore the sovereignty it lost when Napoleon Bonaparte ended the Serenissima:

Venice’s Secession from Italy, Hans-Hermann Hoppe, and Nation-States

Spain, of course, like Italy, has its own history of composition from smaller kingdoms after the Reconquista, with the final union of Castille and Aragon under Ferdinand and Isabella. But at one time, Aragon and Navarre were kingdoms, and of course the Basques in the former region of Navarre have been openly pushing for independence from Spain since the death of General Franco and the restoration of the monarchy. The Venetian referendum, and the Spanish occupations, signal what the real problem is: the super-state as a purely political creation where cultural and economic interests run counter to the political.

And the article hints at something that may be brewing globally as increasingly the centralized democratic governments of the west appear to be almost completely insulated from any real responsiveness to their peoples, and almost totally subservient to the national security/financial oligarchs:

"Given that Obama recently declared all secession movements illegitimate (except those supported by the US Government, of course) it’s unknown how much support Venice can expect from the international community."

Secession movements typically require the support of some major power in order to succeed(witness the case of the Crimea and Russia), so one cannot expect the Stars and Bars to rise over the American South, or the Lion of St. Mark to fly from the towers and spires of Venice, again any time soon. But it's a harbinger of tensions that will not go away because the sittuations creating them, central government indifference and non-responsiveness to its people, has not changed and does not appear to be set to do so any time soon. As a result, the movements of protest not only grow, so also does the order and magnitude of local defiance. Already in the USA many states are passing bills whose clear intention is to reaffirm their sovereignty vis-a-vis the federal government. In many localities, local gun control laws are openly flouted.

My point in all of this? Such movements, whether of occupation of banks in Spain, or secession in Venice, indicate socio-political discontent that is reaching a tipping point, and in such situations, the opportunity for covert operations penetration and manipulation of such movements always arises. And as I have been reminding people, the game of staged coups and covert-operations-driven revolutions is a game that not just the West, or the USA, can play. We may thus be entering, not just the information age, the transhumanist age, but also, the covert operations age.

See you on the flip side.

 

12 thoughts on “SPANISH PROTESTS SHUT DOWN 55 BANKS, VENICE VOTES TO SECEDE”

  1. Robert Barricklow

    One of “Their” objectives/goals is privatization, not only of earth itself; but – in the words of buzz lightyear – to infinity & beyond.
    They desire an electronic feudalism;
    a balkanization of the entire globe.

    With the Breakaway Civilization at the top of this abstract pyramid; whose tip, seemingly separated, is in in absolute control.

    As far as the manipulation of organizations is concerned, it is in the dna of the elitist puppet masters, to not only take over newly established organizations; but to even establish anarchist ones themselves, in order to attract “enemies of the state. They also start terrorist organizations, plus run them in false flags in those, and the others they have contaminated. Their Byzantium intrigues are to die for(literally).
    A good nonfiction work on this is:
    The World That Never Was: A True Story Of Dreamers, Schemers, Anarchists, and Sec ret Agents by Alex Butterworth.

  2. What if Russia and/or China decided to recognize the Republic of Venice? Just for the heck of it, some rash but oh-so-satisfying payback?

    They could also recognize the Basques, Quebec, Brittany and Texas while they’re at it. Who knows? These days anything is possible.

    1. We might observe that, funnily enough, none of the secessionist and “macro-regional” movements in Europe are calling for the breakup of Germany. While Germany itself was a key player in the (second) breakup of Czechslovakia and Yugoslavia, on so-called “ethnic” grounds.

    1. marcos toledo

      Thanks for the link Celtic Death Star I just listen to the two hour interview great stuff.

  3. marcos toledo

    Lew Rockwell left one problem out of this what if you local government hates your community or social groups guts. And would feel free to wipe it out and the only thing standing in the way of that dream is the nation state what then. Thou I know this cuts both ways. I wonder what the descendants of the Red Shirts that united Italy and Mussolini’s Black Shirts say in the matter of the resurrection of the Serine Republic of Venice. Given how that city state along with the Papal See screw Italy, Germany and the latter stab in the back Ireland. Well the dirty secret out the lust for tribal warfare that grips this planet. Just wondering who is profiting from all these super tribal feeling. As for the real tribes don’t even think about it our we the super tribes will blow you off the face of the earth.

  4. Secessions are not good because we wind up with new nation-states… Our autonomous municipalities in biorregional concert, as proposed, set in place criteria for a certain level of protectionism for certain parts of the agricultural production. Silvio Gesell’s “natural” economy fits in with his excellent proposals for a dependable currency monitored by a decentralizing state organization that puts to rest the State as an end in itself. The dissolution of the nation-state and its central banks and the affirmation of cultural or linguistic commonwealths in each municipality. Closest to sovereinty would be your own house… The disappearance of all victimles crimes included. http://www.institutosimoneweil.net

  5. Fascinating post and excellent point.
    Our history of how we treat succession and self-determination is of course a highly inconsistent and selective one. Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania – good; CSA – bad, for example.
    In many ways it seems to be an answer to many of the ills infecting us all, paring the size of governments back in proportion while theoretically cutting the powers of the Elite handlers.

    1. Since I’m Latvian I’ll have a go at answering. Now I’m only speaking of Baltic independence from the soviet union, *not* joining NATO. The Baltics have separate languages (we use a roman alphabet not Cyrillic), cultural and even genetic differences. Yes, there’s been a history of us being overrun by the Germans, Russians, Swedes and even Polish duchy. Guess what, we don’t accept some other country’s or political faction’s suppression of an area as a valid reason why it should happen again in present time. And I don’t think joining NATO (or even the EU) is particularly good for us either. Perhaps if we were into banking and arms dealing like the neutral Swiss or Swedes, this would be easier. I think Finland (post WW2) is the better example to go with for all ex-USSR states. Friendship towards all with favoritism towards none. I won’t go into the “population stuffing” of russians into the Baltic countries, which could be used as a casus belli for Russia to come in and “save” their brethren. Of course, many have come west in order to gain EU residency, if not citizenship. Can’t have your cake and eat it too.
      As for the CSA, having been to the South, I think they still think the fight’s on. Of course, there was a huge amount of interference from Britain in the Civil war. Of course, they love the empire/slavery/drug trafficking model so they’d just assume to keep that going.
      Though “limited govt” might be the outcome of smaller states (and Webster Tarpley really goes into this), you’d end up with petty, squabbling rump states, no unity, and give the oligarchy even more ease wit which to manipulate or pit groups against one another, rather than dismantling the oligarchy.
      This is probably why aliens haven’t invaded…

  6. Did Obama declare all secession illegal or did he just cite the UN policies on secession? The UN has stated that the Crimea secession was illegal. Blaming Obama for everything just drives me nuts, as it just shows sloppy journalism IMO.

  7. The. Covert operation age was the inspiration to invent writing. It is very old, the game has been expanded too many times. The people running the game are not creative. They are reading ancient programs.

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