Banksters

JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT THOSE BANKSTER “SUICIDES” ...

July 3, 2014 By Joseph P. Farrell

A few days ago I blogged about the strange hit and run death of JP Morgan banker and bankruptcy lawyer Joseph Giampapa in Ohio. But now there's a story out there circulating about another bankster, one that was previously suicided: Gabriel Magee. It seems, according to the latest story, that Mr. Magee was obsessed with the multi-verse interpretation of quantum mechanics, and that his suicide (so we're told) had something to do with a possible attempt by him to get out of this universe and into another one:

JP Morgan Bank Exec Kills Himself To Escape Into Parallel Universe

Now, at first glance, your reaction was probably the same as mine: to dismiss this story as being nothing other than a bizarre story designed, perhaps, to deflect attention away from what may be going on behind all the financial "deaths". But closer reading compels some high octane speculation. Consider these paragraphs from the article:

"An inquest last week has revealed that a JP Morgan exec that committed suicide earlier this year was obsessed with the concept of parallel universes and a mysterious suicide pact between two American students based on the theory.

"Gabriel Magee, 39, fell from the roof of the bank’s Canary Wharf headquarters on the morning of January 28. Investigators revealed to the inquest at Poplar Coroner’s Court in London that a number of documents on Magee’s computer bore desperate messages, like “Trying to jump off building” and “Hate life.”

Then consider these highly significant revelations:

"Magee’s former girlfriend Lucy Pinches told the inquest that Magee had a 'dark side' and was 'traumatized' after their breakup last year: 'He was lovely,' she said, 'but… he would sit in a room with the curtains drawn, sometimes he didn’t want to socialize. It was very difficult.'"
...
“I don’t understand that properly but that was something Gabe thought about a lot and had the mental capacity to think about it a lot, with the equations and the physics.”(Emphases added)
In other words, Magee was what is known in the financial business as a quant, an individual with a background in the higher mathematics behind high frequency trading. And that mathematics, as a little research will show you, comes from the influx of trained physicists into finance that began in the late 1980s, as the methods of mathematically modelling quantum mechanics were realized to be applicable to the financial sector, and "econophysics' was born. Would multi-verse theory play a role in such financial modelling? Potentially, yes.
So Mr. Magee's "suicide" may, once again, be deeply related to something he discovered, or learned, about the financial system. Only by coupling it to econophysics and multiverse theory, the stakes are raised considerably....
See you on the flip side...