Banksters

THE BANKER DEATHS SCRAPBOOK: CANADIAN INVESTMENT ADVISOR MURRAY ABBOT ...

May 25, 2015 By Joseph P. Farrell

There has been another said death of a "banker" to add to a growing, and growingly perplexing, list, this time of Canadian Murray Abbot, an investment advisor for Morgan Stanley. (These two articles were shared by Ms. K.F., and Mr. C.S., to whom goes our gratitude);
Missing Morgan Stanley trader found dead in Lake Ontario near Toronto’s Beaches

Murray Abbott, Missing Morgan Stanley Trader, Dies at 36

There are some oddities to note here, not the least being that the Financial Post article of May 12, reference Bloomberg as the source of its story, and in the Bloomberg article itself, which is dated May 11, one day before. In the May 11th article, we read the following:

His death wasn’t suspicious, Mark Pugash, a Toronto Police Service spokesman, said Tuesday in a telephone interview. “It was obviously a very tragic missing person’s case."

The death is not suspicious, merely "a very tragic missing person's case." Yet, a day later, this appears to have been tacitly retracted by the second article;

"Police are awaiting an autopsy before determining the cause of death of Abbott, who went missing two weeks ago, Detective Constable Neil Thornton said in a telephone interview Monday."

One might wonder what caused this subtle change, but perhaps it was careful consideration of the fact that the unfortunate Mr. Abbot was missing for approximately two weeks before being found. Presumably, if he had somehow fallen into Lake Ontario and drowned early on in the two week period, he would most likely have been found much sooner than he was. While Lake Ontario is a big place, big enough to lose a body in, it is also a busy place. This might suggest that he met his end prior to ending up in Lake Ontario, and thus, an autopsy might lead to conclusions that his death was something other than "a very tragic missing person's case."

Well... maybe...

But if it was not just another "very tragic missing person's case," then what might it be? There's a pattern that Mr. Abbot fits, and it's here:

Abbott was a vice president and one of 16 people on the institutional equities desk at Morgan Stanley’s Canadian wealth-management division. He joined the New York-based bank in 2010, following jobs at Toronto-based brokerage Blackmont Capital Inc. and Research Capital Corp.

“He was larger than life, a very gregarious guy, very well liked by clients,” Laura Adams, head of Morgan Stanley’s Canadian equity-distribution business, said Tuesday in a telephone interview. “He was just a super guy.”

Abbott’s clients included mutual funds, pension plans, hedge funds and banks, according to Adams, who hired Abbott and was his manager.

“Clients really enjoyed working with him, he was well liked and had a very strong network across Bay Street,” Adams said. “He just worked really hard and had a great work ethic.”

One part of that pattern fits many of the other strange bankers' deaths that we have blogged about on this website, namely, Mr. Abbot was a respected co-worker, very professional, and well-liked, and, apparently, a very moral and ethical man. This pattern we have seen before, as mystified family and friends are at a loss to explain why their loved ones would commit "suicide"(or rather, as we suspect in many cases, have been suicided). This factor is, I submit, an important one in whatever pattern may be emerging in these suspicious deaths, for it connotes invididuals who, if they were to encounter data or activities in conflict with their principles, might be constrained to report it or otherwise bring it to the attention of authorities, either within their own corporate structures, or within their respective national governments.

And here Mr. Abbot fits yet another pattern that seems to be repeated in these deaths, namely, he was in a position to encounter such data and/or activities in the first place. In this respect, Mr. Abbot had access to data concerning "institutional equities, mutual funds, pension plans, hedge funds, and banks." This conglomeration would have put him into a position to see, perhaps, aggregate financial activity of a suspicious nature. In this, he joins a growing list of suspicious deaths that would seem to indicate that someone, somewhere, is trying to conceal something. The question is, what?

Here my "high octane speculation" differs somewhat with that of others who have covered these stories, in that I do not think these banker deaths have anything to do with scenarios of "immanent collapse" of the western financial system. At least, not in the conventional sense. Rather, I think they might have everything to do with people who might have discovered significant evidence for the existence of what I have called a "hidden system of finance," one put into place after World War Two to fund both massive and long term covert operations projects, and massive and long term black projects research projects. Additionally, one might assume that in uncovering evidence of such a system, people in the position of Mr. Abbot might have gained peculiar insight into the actual day-to-day detailed functioning of such a system. As such, they would pose a threat not only to that system, but to national security, if they threatened to expose it.  But even  here one is left with something of a mystery: why go to all the trouble of murdering so many bankers under such increasingly suspicious circumstances, thereby drawing further attention to something that one would presumably want to keep entirely out of the public's eye? Why not simply "threaten" or "warn" such people into silence? Unless, of course, they already had been so warned.

In the end, we are left with more questions than answers, but, as the list grows, the pattern outlined above becomes clearer, with each addition confirming its broad outlines. And with the mention, in Mr. Abbot's case, of institutional equities and hedge funds, the possibility of my "high octane speculation" being perhaps the motivation behind these deaths would seem to have been ratcheted up considerably.

See you on the flip side...