INDEPENDENCE DAY'S SEQUEL: A VERY WEIRD WAY TO PROMOTE A MOVIE...

INDEPENDENCE DAY’S SEQUEL: A VERY WEIRD WAY TO PROMOTE A ...

May 22, 2016 By Joseph P. Farrell

Now this one is so bizarre I simply have to blog about it, for it was brought to my attention by one of the members of this website in our most recent members' vidchat, call him Mr. C.G. What's it about? Well, you may or may not have heard that there is a sequel in the works right now to the 1990s blockbuster movie Independence Day. You may remember that one: big alien saucers are launched by a gigantic extra-terrestrial mothership, and these saucers park themselves over the world's major cities and capitals, where they hover ominously for a few hours, while the President of the United States and his staff attempt to communicate with the aliens, and movie hero Jeff Goldblum figures out that the Earth's satellites have been penetrated and are being used by the alien fleet to coordinate a countdown.

All hopes that "they come in peace" evaporate when the countdown ends, and the massive saucers power-up gigantic "plasma cannon" and proceed to vaporize skyscrapers like the Empire State building, which somehow fuels the plasmas, which roll through the world's cities and cause massive destruction. As the saucer parked above the White House in Washington DC powers up its plasma cannon, the President and his staff are quickly evacuated, making their way eventually to Area 51 as the aliens blast the White House and level Washington DC (you may recall that at the time, this scene received wild applause in American theaters). At Area 51, the President is shown a recovered body and craft from the aliens that was captured decades previously, and Will Smith, the other hero of the movie, shows up, dragging a live alien behind him, having captured him(or her, or it, we never know for sure) behind him. This alien, in response to the President's questioning him(or her, or it) as to what the aliens want humanity to do, simply says "Die."

Will Smith and Jeff Goldblum use the satellite networks to plant a virus in the alien mothership and fly the recovered alien craft into it, and detonate a thermonuclear bomb inside it, blowing it(and the alien invasion fleet) up, and this causes the shields in all the gigantic saucer craft hovering over the world's cities and blasting them apart with their plasma cannon to fail, and human aircraft all over the world begin to successfully shoot down the saucers.

Invasion repelled, aliens defeated, happy ending.

Right?

Wrong.

The premise of the sequel to Independence Day is based, of course, on some very upset aliens returning twenty years later to wreak their revenge, and to finish the job of wiping out humanity and invading Earth and claiming it for themselves that they began two decades previously. In the meantime, of course, Earth has built up its defenses (doubtless using the usual "reverse engineering" theme, we humans being too dumb to do anything really creative without ET crashing stuff on our planet for us to reverse engineer.)

Now, in this light, ponder the following commercial on YouTube, which seems to be an obvious reference to the two Independence Day movies:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N-rWdf4XNbw&feature=youtu.be

Now, you'll note that the video has underneath the video frame on YouTube the logo of the U.S. Army, plus a link to its website, "GOARMY.COM". Traveling to that website, and searching for "ESD Dad" reveals no search results.

But wait, there's more. On the YouTube posting you'll note the statement: " Visit JoinESD.com today to challenge your problem-solving skills, view exclusive content from the film Independence Day: Resurgence and find out if you have what it takes to defend the Earth." So, going to that link, and one again finds the US Army logo on the bottom left of the screen, with a clickable link.

So, you tell me, what's going on here? Well, for one thing, apparently there's some sort of "deal" possibly between the new movie and its marketing experts - and one has to admit, the marketing seems to be very good - and the US Army, which on its own website isn't saying anything about the weird "commercial" nor about the movie. But beyond this, nothing. It does raise all sorts of high octane speculation in my mind, and I suspect it does the same for you as well, and I suspect the implications and speculations running through your mind are more or less the same as mine: is this, for example, a tacit way of admitting that something like the Independence Day scenarios are at work, or, alternatively, looming, and this is the way to "prepare" people for it?

Well, I frankly don't know. But I do find this whole preculiar association bizarre to say the least, and even more so in the light of tomorrow's blog.

See you on the flip side...