Space-orbit-satellite

THAT GLOWING SIBERIAN BALL THING…

November 3, 2017 By Joseph P. Farrell

Mr. S.C. spotted this one, and I have to blog about it because it is a small bit of confirmation for all you Tom Bearden fans out there.

Russia, it seems, is experiencing some sort of UFO flap in recent days, and among these, there is a very large "glowing ball" that has been seen in Siberia, and when I saw this, I couldn't help but laugh and think of Colonel Bearden, who not only reported and wrote about this phenomenon decades ago, but made an arguably good case that what we were seeing was not UFOs, but very human, and very Russian technology. Here's the story from the U.K.'s Daily Mail:

Enormous glowing ball is seen over northern Siberia after fuel from four Russian rockets tested overnight created an illusion in the sky (but locals thought it could be a UFO)

As one can gather from reading the article, the Russian government is explaining all this (or perhaps, explaining all this away) as the simple result of Russian ICBM tests of its Topol missiles in the Arctic as part of its recent wargames military exercises. It's more "nuclear saber" rattling, in other words, from a country that hardly needs to rattle its nuclear saber, because pretty much everyone in the world knows that Russia has hydrogen bombs and missiles, and lots of them.

But for those familiar with Lt. Col. Bearden's work, he's been reporting on these strange glowing balls in Russia since 1979, when the first incident was recorded by Iranian pilots flying near the Russian border. For Bearden, these balls were evidence of Russian testing and perfection of "Tesla" type "scalar" weapons, weapons which could conceivably and in his opinion function as missile defense shields, or which, alternatively, could be used in an offensive capacity and even - here it comes - as an electromagnetic means to induce diseases or alter human mental functioning. Bearden made the argument in several books and papers that this project began at the end of World War Two, when two things impelled the Russian secret research: (1) the capture of a German radar team under the direction of Dr. Richard Hellman (aptly named, as it turns out!), and (2) an alleged directive from Stalin to the Soviet Academy of Sciences to "find something" in the science papers of the West to do an end run around its vast nuclear superiority. Bearden gave briefings to the U.S. military on this Russian research, and then subsequently published his findings in a number of books and papers.

Regarding the first point, the German radar team captured by the Soviets had, toward the end of the war, discovered a principle of phase conjugation when interferring several radar beams on their prototypical radar stealth material: tiny balls of metal resonant to various frequencies used by British and American radar, embedded in the non-linear material of rubber, which was then used to coat the schnorkel devices of Germany's late U-boat fleet. In the tests, their radar sets were blown out, according to Bearden, by phase conjugate waves returning to the sets from the material. The Soviets took Dr. Hellman and his team to Russia, where they were used to teach the Russians everything they new, and then, like the German atomic bomb scientist Baron Manfred von Ardenne, released (in von Ardenne's case, after receiving the prestigious Stalin prize for science, the Soviet equivalent of the Nobel prize, and the only non-Soviet to ever earn it). Hellman made his way to Brazil(!) where he ostensibly continued his work for the Brazilian government. (For the details of these stories and Bearden's research, see my books Reich of the Black Sun and SS Brotherhood of the Bell).

Regarding the second point, Stalin's instructions to the Soviet Academy of Sciences, Bearden reports that the Soviets established massive bureaus to literally comb through every scientific paper and publication in western physics and mathematics journals going all the way back to the years prior to the First World War, and to pull any papers that were thought to be promising enough to investigate for "breakthroughs" and weaponization, and do an end run around nuclear weapons. While that story is too long to recount here - again, my books recount much of it - the result, according to Bearden, was the development of a whole new class of electromagnetic phenomena and weapons. Interestingly enough, if you've been following the news and pronouncements from the Kremlin lately, the Russian media is openly reporting about these things and doing so in such a way that emphasizes the idea of a "new physics."

Part of that physics is "large glowing balls of light."

You may have noticed something else peculiar about the article: the balls are being reported in the northeastern, European part of the Russian arctic, in addition to Siberia, which recalls the "Norwegian spiral" incident of 2008... remember that one? A strange glowing "spiral" appeared over northern Russia, again concurrent with a Russian ICBM test (again of a Topol missile). The missile test apparently failed, and researchers noted two odd coincident things: Angela Merkel told Mr. Obama that Germany did not want, nor need, America's missile defense shield (did they have something better?), and Mr. Obama was in Norway receiving his Nobel Peace Prize for doing...well, essentially nothing. At the time of the spiral and the missile test, Europe's EISCAT ionospheric heater, in which Germany plays the crucial role, was allegedly running at full power. That led me and others to speculate that it was "all related" and that the Russians had been sent "a message".

Which brings us back to this story of Russian missile tests, glowing balls, and Kremlin statements, for if my high octane speculation about the Norwegian spiral and the Russian 2008 missile tests be true, then perhaps the Russians just responded to that message, and sent another one back: "We fixed the problem in our missiles, and can make new and improved spirals and glowing balls too." Throw in the USS Donald Cook incidents, the McCain and Fitzgerald incidents, Cuban embassy "sonic weapons" attacks, and someone is sending a whole lot of EM warfare messages...

... but we're supposed to be worried about North Korea...

See you on the flip side...