UFO - Unidentified Flying Objects

CHINA’S LOW TECH NEW ANTI-SATELLITE WEAPON

You'll recall that yesterday I blogged about the current NASA director Bill Nelson's strange statements regarding UFOs and what they might be. They could be literally anything, from extra-terrestrial probes to advanced Chinese or Russian technology or even the technology of some non-state human actor. But whatever they are, they clearly constitute a national security "issue" if not outright "threat." Or as I argued yesterday, the "narrative options" were kept open, but the unifying factor to all the narratives was the "national security" threat.

In that context, consider the following story shared by W.G. concerned a new "low-tech" Chinese anti-satellite weapon:

NEW WEAPON FROM CHINA REPORTEDLY CAUSES SATELLITES TO EXPLODE

This is an interesting weapon, if the description in the article proves to be true:

A team of scientists in China have created a device that uses explosives to destroy enemy satellites.

The weapon can be inserted inside of a satellite’s exhaust nozzle, according to The South China Morning PostA paper published about the device and obtained by SCMP says that it can detonate to create a “time-controlled, steady explosion.”

Astonishingly, the weapon leaves the satellite intact after exploding, instead damaging the probe’s interior. The SCMP reports that since the explosion is partially contained, it could be mistaken for an engine mishap.

While it’s unclear how exactly the device would be inserted into a satellite, this method does offer a novel way of incapacitating offending probes without using lasers or missiles, which are easily detectable — and hints at a future in which spycraft involves sabotaging active satellites in orbit.

In other words, the new weapon is capable of maneuvering and attaching itself to another satellite - in this instance, the exhaust port of a satellite's  rockets - a capability that also implies the ability to (1) maneuver and collide with a satellite and damaging or destroying it through sheer kinetic force, or (2) maneuver and attach itself to the exterior of a satellite and then explode, or even (3) maneuver and attach itself to a satellite, and perhaps to "hijack" that satellite for another power, perhaps even hijacking its hardware and software in a kind of space-cyber hijacking.

I mention all these possibilities because of a few incidents and stories you might recall in recent space news. For example, a recent study in the United Kingdom mentioned "space piracy" as a concern, and piracy, of course, involves the theft of another power's resources, stolen on the high seas. There's a hidden implication to the concern about space piracy. Pirates, historically, were of two basic sorts: (1) those working under the cover of piracy for one sea power against another sea power's ocean going commerce and assets, and (2) those working entirely for themselves and not for any power at all, in effect making them non-state actors. It's that second possibility that intrigues, because in yesterday's blog I pointed out that NASA's UFO concerns also were thinking in terms of of the possibility non-state (but entirely human) actors possessing advanced "UFO" technologies. It seems a bit too convenient that the UK is talking about space piracy, and NASA is talking about "non-state actors" in possession of such technologies.

There's an incident in this regard that touches on all these stories. You might recall that in 2009 a Russian communications satellite Kosmos 2251 and an American satellite, Iridium 33, collided in orbit above the Earth at high velocity. Both satellites were destroyed, and the news media duly reported the story, and moved on. The story was a big "ho hum... all that space debris up there... just an accidental collision... nothing to see here, move along." At the time, I along with a few others (Richard C. Hoagland for example) thought the story was highly significant, and I still do, and for a very simple reason: neither Russia nor the United States are in the habit of placing satellites in orbit where they are going to collide with other satellites, even under circumstances of orbital decay, and so on. Nor is either country in the habit of not moving their satellites if it appears a collision is possible. Finally, there was the speed... both satellites were travelling at high speed. This was not a case of a fast-moving satellite striking a piece of space debris. It was more like a case of a bullet striking another bullet in mid-flight.

Or to put it simply: someone had moved the satellites. It was not an accident; it was a demonstration. The collision was not accidental, but deliberate. Either the US, or Russia, or "someone" had maneuvered the collision. It is interesting to note that after that collision, Russia, China, and the USA all carried out "near approach" missions in space with their satellites, maneuvering them close to each other's satellites.

To tie all this together into one big knot of high octane speculation, it would appear that the concerns about "space piracy" and "non-state actors" might not be future concerns, but rather, lessons and conclusions from the past.

And China - if this story be true - has just invented a satellite torpedo...

See you on the flip side...

 

27 thoughts on “CHINA’S LOW TECH NEW ANTI-SATELLITE WEAPON”

  1. How about a space centered Denial of Service operation. Space blackmail. In other words… Do what we tell you to do or say what we want you to say and finally pay what we want you to pay or you’ll lose your satellite constellation. Now we know what makes SpaceX so valuable to the feds… a cheap way to put satellites back in orbit.

  2. Given that NORAD has been monitoring bits and pieces to include viable satellites (easy targets) for decades, devices sneaking up to US & Ally assets will likely be picked up sooner than later. It’s likely the pursuit of such (inferred (stolen) (transferred)) technologies is more important than hearsay chats to instigate action in that direction of commerce and research & development. It is a race after all as well as who has the most to invest, deploy (qualitatively), and whether one more economic stressor can be handled by parties involved. Been there – done that several times actually. Capital markets continue to win when angsts by an aggressor. Cold War was an example well documented.

    There’s a lot of monitoring out there going on by those that own the night and prefer to say little.

  3. Are we being sold on a war by marketing the plausibility of an evil power or being given an excuse for an evil power taking over the world?

    Along these lines, amazing hear the most left people on the planet lumped in with far right radicals. And hearing how they/we react.

    Even more so amazing hearing Chomskey turning full on totalitarian.

    Jimmy Dore, Glenn Greenwald on Russell Brand
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bC9LRwrjjc&t=929s
    Russell Brand “Canceled” For Telling Truth About RussiaGate & Hillary! – YouTube

    Jimmy Dore, Max Blumenthal on Chomskey manufacturing contempt
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpEch0McjZ0
    “Isolate Unvaxxed From Society” says Noam Chomsky – YouTube

    1. Is it even possible to avoid bringing up the old banana in the tailpipe trick> Did anyone here use that or a potato as a kid on someone’s car?

    2. I think the categories of right and left have lost most of their meaning. The important divide today is totalitarian globalist elitists (right and left) on the one hand vs. freedom-loving sovereignist “populists” (right and left) on the other.

  4. … it looks as though the Chinese have reinvented the wheel …

    “On 13 September 1985, Maj. Wilbert D. “Doug” Pearson, flying the “Celestial Eagle” F-15A 76-0084 launched an ASM-135 ASAT about 200 miles (322 km) west of Vandenberg Air Force Base and destroyed the Solwind P78-1 satellite flying at an altitude of 345 miles (555 km). Prior to the launch, the F-15 – flying at Mach 1.22 – executed a 3.8g zoom climb at an angle of 65 degrees. The ASM-135 ASAT was automatically launched at 38,100 ft while the F-15 was flying at Mach .934.[8] The 30 lb (13.6 kg) MHV collided with the 2,000 lb (907 kg) Solwind P78-1 satellite at closing velocity of 15,000 mph (24,140 km/h).”

    … nothing new under the sun …

  5. And the ivory tower academics at the beginning of the space age wrote that space piracy was the stuff of childish science fiction stories. Little could they imagine that space is more like the oceans of Earth a pirate paradise with lots of places to hide the major problems will be off the books actors think Mission Impossible types Organize Crime Syndicates and governments that were thought to have ceased to exist NAZIs come to mind. Leave it to the Chinese to come up with a cheap but effective means to deal with their adversaries.

    1. Piracy is very much involved with stolen and compromised technologies and a litle late to catch the tails of those Tigers, too. Now its a race where that “Un-restricted Warfare” fits neatly into place and is multi-purposed to order when the opportunities arise.

  6. A book on my wants list for those interested in Chinese strategic thinking with regard to the US and the West in general. Frequently references the ancient war classic The Thirty-Six Stratagems: The Hundred-Year Marathon by Michael Pillsbury, Griffin Publishing 2016. “The Hundred-Year Marathon reveals China’s secret strategy to supplant the United States as the world’s dominant power, and to do so by 2049, the one hundredth anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic. Michael Pillsbury, who has served in senior national security positions in the U.S. government since the days of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, draws on Chinese documents, speeches, and books (many of them never translated into English) to reveal the roots of this strategy in traditional Chinese statecraft and track how the Chinese are putting it into practice today. Pillsbury shows how American policymakers have been willfully blind to these developments for decades-and he includes himself in that critique, as he was once a leading voice in favor of aiding China. He also calls for the United States to design a new, more competitive strategy toward China as it really is, and not as we might wish it to be.”

    1. “When it comes time to hang the capitalists, they will vie with each other for the rope contract.”

      Instead of rope we have become dependent on cheap goods, cheap labor, and instant consumption. And now, the squeeze is on.

      1. Robert Barricklow

        A quarter ahead Wall Street outlook[3 months].
        That gives a lot of rope to work with; for those that are in it, for the long run.

  7. Robert Barricklow

    Just operating off the headline.
    How many ways are there to take out a satellite.
    How many ways are there
    to change the information the satellite sends & receives?

    1. Robert Barricklow

      Put in the satellite’s exhaust nozzle.
      Just when are those horse & buggy satellites going to be replace by current technology?
      Surely, all know about these hidden technologies?
      Meanwhile they’re operating under a 1967bOuter Space Treaty. As the decades have gone by; other nations have joined the U.S. & Russia in space, and the technologies have become vastly more sophisticated.
      All advanced nations have what they term as inspector satellites. They’re smaller, more agile w/ precise navigation and controls; most often employed to closely approach or dock w/friendly crafts to assess for maintenance.
      Russia got in trouble w/the U.S. recently using a big satellite, that was likened to a Matryoshka doll. Out of it a baby zipped around and changed orbit constantly-an exceptional performance in space, where fuel is at a precious premium. Then that baby satellite, released a smaller object; fired a projectile in orbit. U.S. Space command had Russia saying they had to remain mum on the precise details of what happened.
      Pont is there’s a lot they’re not telling us.

      The real line in space are the nukes.
      Yes, there not there. But, if you do go there and take out someone’s nuke. That’s an act o war.
      All military assets are surrounded by a “use it or lose it” ethos. Once conflict begins, it’s – fire that missile before it’s taken out!
      Because space assets are so far away; the threat must be assumed. It’s known in the space warfare biz as, “the tyranny of distance.”

      Throw pirates of any flavor in the mix, and it can get ugly taste that give the Jolly Roger it’s poisonous symbolism/Skull & Bones = deadly poison.

  8. Rather curious that of all the satellites in the Iridium constellation, it was the [Masonic] #33 satellite that was hit. Can’t help but wonder if there wasn’t a message sent from someone to someone via this fact. Other facts that makes one go hmmmmm…

    – original constellation was planned for 77 satellites (hence “Iridium,” the 77th element), which was reduced to 66 once analysis revealed this was sufficient (plus orbital spares).

    – 66 satellites are divided into groups of 11, each in 6 high inclination polar orbital planes spaced 30 deg apart. Bit of a 666 vibe.

    – the are in-orbit spare Iridium satellites, in case one(s) of the 66 should fail. These spares are parked in an orbit at 666 km altitude (you can’t make this stuff up).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iridium_satellite_constellation

    – one advantage of the Iridium low Earth orbit (LEO) constellation geometry v. more typical geostationary comms satellites’ orbit over a spot on the equator is that Iridium allows for comms in the high polar regions. Handy, say, if you wanted to communicate with someone anywhere in Antarctica.

    Beyond this story potentially being part of what may be a campaign by TPTB to foment war with China, from a military perspective such an anti-satellite (ASAT) tech is brilliant in its simplicity. The Iridium 33 collision and the 2007 Chinese ASAT test of destroying its Fengyun-1C weather satellite both generated significant space debris – each little piece of debris is a hyper-velocity shrapnel that is a danger to other satellites and space vehicles.

    Almost as if the Chinese said, after their 2007 ASAT test, “Oops. Maybe this is counter-productive in the long run.”

    1. ..as an afterthought to my comment below, in the context of your remark about space-debris and Dr Farrell’s three options for interfering sat-on-sat, I would guess the emphasis now would likely be on simultaneously disabling your target’s propulsion systems, and using the motors of your own ‘torpedo’ to nudge them out of stable orbit and into decay. That way, you get rid, but without the problem of residual bullets flying everywhere and messing up your own sat’s.

      1. Robert Barricklow

        These orbital belts surrounding Earth are now crowded highways of around seven thousand satellites[Musk’s Starlink, as of May launched more than 1,700 into LEO], moving up to speeds of 17,000 miles/hr.[admit to]. Many are dual use[military/commercial]. 3,000 of them no longer in use.
        U.S. Space Command tracks these and wrecks and alerts operators around the world when objects are due to collide. Though actual crashes are rare, the military now issues more than 100, 000 of these warnings each day! Those who really study this phenomena in space; have a meme for it: “congested, contested, and competition”

  9. Privateering! Is Space-X the new Drake? Singeing the King of Spain’s Beard?

    Space, even LEO/Geo-stationary, is colossal – simply huge. Think of the chances of random collision between two ships on the oceans of the world – even along open shipping lanes – and multiply the improbability by hundreds, thousands ..ANY collision is almost certainly deliberate.

    I did some simple computing work for my son’s piracy risk-mapping dissertation, and the overwhelming danger was in coastal areas, adjacent to havens and within the energetic possibilities of target-acquisition. In space, the strictures are only intensified. Hence, I guess, the concentration on coherent-beam radiation weapons, which do, however, have their own problems, as everyone knows. So you’re left with a choice between essentially projectile weaponry, whether explosive or not (qv the recent debacle docking of a Russian capsule with the ISS), and much longer range, but less controllable, lasers/masers and the like.

    I myself have recently seen what appeared to be a satellite taken out in orbit – from its behaviour and your article here, I would now say that it was destroyed by some kind of kinetic interference rather than a beam weapon.

    I’d also hazard a guess at another possible aspect to those notorious chem-trails. Over the last couple of years, since the virus struck, we in the UK have seen a completely novel pattern of atmospheric clouding, closely associated with the trails – silver skies, anomalous UV, and other aspects, as noted by many here and elsewhere. Is it possible that these are (among many other things) an attempt to shield the ground-population from radiative overreach – spallation, refractive effects, or other intrinsic control weaknesses – causing possible landfall of dangerous beams? The chemicals do perhaps have exactly the right absorptive characteristics, as cited by many people as being intended to cool the Earth by dimming the Sun.

    Just a thought..

    1. The Elephant Underground

      And speaking of Chemtrails, Elana Freeland’s final book in the trilogy series: Geoengineered Transhumanism: How the Environment Has Been Weaponized by Chemicals, Electromagnetics, & Nanotechnology for Synthetic Biology (October 2021 release) fully ties in how the spraying been used to get those nano-bots inside us.

    2. That massive amount of satelites being launched by Musk may have another layer of intended use. Create another layer of ultimate space debris at higher level, working as a shield similar to chem trails, to block somekind of thread coming from “up there”?

  10. anakephalaiosis

    Space reptilians showing off, playing satellite marbles, to impress gaslighted plebs, into believing in ufoology and carbon tax.

    HOGWARTS IN SCOTLAND 1

    Lizzy Lizard, reptile from outer space,
    was caught in elaborate maze,
    set forth by rising day
    of Earl Grey,
    in breakfast blend of grace.

    Earl Grey riddle:
    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/qmp6qxil1ewow10/iq-test.jpg

    Parry Hotter ABC:
    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/pnz9jpb73u1gfla/druidry-for-dummies.pdf

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