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NOW IT’S A SUBMARINE AND AN UNDERSEA MOUNTAIN

OK... I've been meaning to talk about this story, but decided to wait a bit and see what sort of explanation the US Navy coughed up. As many readers here are probably already aware, some days ago a US Navy attack submarine, the USS Connecticut collided with a something during operations in the South China Sea. Here's RT's reportage of the event - and "explanation" - shared by D.P. (with our thanks):

US nuclear sub struck undersea MOUNTAIN in South China Sea incident last month, investigation reportedly finds

As the title indicates, the Navy is claiming the submarine crashed into an uncharted "undersea mountain":

After nearly a month of investigating an incident involving a fast-attack submarine in the Pacific, the US Navy has reportedly concluded that the vessel ran aground on the seabed after colliding with an uncharted mountain.

The USS 'Connecticut' hit the “seamount” on October 2 while operating in the international waters of the South China Sea, USNI News reported on Monday, citing a spokesperson for the US 7th Fleet. The results of the investigation have been submitted to Vice Admiral Karl Thomas, the 7th Fleet commander, who will determine whether “follow-on actions, including accountability, are appropriate.”

Now, you're probably thinking the same thing I am, and that this sounds like two other incidents in the Pacific basin involving collisions of US warships with civilian shipping, the USS John Fitzgerald in Japanese waters, and the USS John McCain  in the crowded waters around Singapore. And the folks at RT are thinking the same thing:

The incident marked the first known underwater collision involving a US submarine since 2005, when the USS 'San Francisco' nuclear attack submarine plowed into an undersea mountain at full speed near Guam. One sailor was killed in that crash, and most of the other 136 crew members were injured.

The US Navy’s surface-level ships have had a bad run of crashes in the Asia-Pacific region in recent years, including an August 2017 collision between the USS 'John S. McCain' destroyer and an oil tanker off the coast of Singapore that left 10 American sailors dead. About two months earlier, another destroyer, the USS 'Fitzgerald' struck a container ship while on a secret mission off the coast of Japan, killing seven crew members.

That same year, the USS 'Antietam' guided-missile cruiser ran aground in Japan, spilling oil into Tokyo Bay; and another cruiser, the USS 'Lake Champlain', collided with a South Korean fishing vessel.

As noted, the collision of the USS Connecticut isn't the first US submarine to hit a mountain.

Like with the USS Fitzgerald and USS John McCain incidents, I have my suspicions, and am simply not buying this latest explanation. For one thing, the South China Sea is (relatively) shallow. While I can certainly accept that the ocean depths are not completely  charted, the term "mountain" usually connotes something 1000 to 2000 feet above the mean surrounding area (at least, on land). Surprisingly when I tried to find out what qualifies for an undersea mountain, I did not find much help. But in any case, a "mountain" in the South China Sea would - on those definitions - probably tend to be an island. And I have my doubts about anything in the relative shallowness of the South China sea being uncharted. Possible? Certainly. Likely?  I have doubts.

I know I'm quibbling, but to a purpose (I hope), because the article implies something is going on with the response of Vice Admiral Thomas, "who will determine whether 'follow-on actions, including accountability, are appropriate." That seems to imply that (1) either the "mountain" was charted and the submarine recklessly ran into it, or (2) the submarine ran into something else(we'll get back to that), or (3) there was nothing else there  and there was an internal incident which is being covered up by the undersea mountain explanation, or -and this one is my inclination at present- (4) there was an uncharted mountain, but the submarine had technologies that would have disclosed its presence, but nonetheless evasive action was not taken.

In other words, the admiral's response suggests that operations were not normal on the submarine.

Then, of course, there's another explanation other than the proffered uncharted mountain and un-used technologies scenario: poor training standards among the officer class.

Or to put it bluntly, this is no longer the navy of Admirals Nimitz, King, or Halsey...

... and of course, there is one penultimate possibility: the submarine hit an unidentified submerged object.

... and of course, there's another possibility, and that's a back door into the submarine's computer systems. But that would also require a ground-based VLF or ULF antenna, and that limits the possible players considerably...

See you on the flip side...

24 thoughts on “NOW IT’S A SUBMARINE AND AN UNDERSEA MOUNTAIN”

  1. Robert Barricklow

    If the Nazi International can takeover 9/11 from w/in;
    having a submarine hitting a mountain is child’s play.

    That’s why dual military use of 5G is asking for it.
    Or, is that the plan?
    Like Agatha Christie’s Murder On the Orient Express, “they’re” all killers.
    So, in the end; it really doesn’t matter who does the deed?

    A possible scenario, where art mimics reality?

  2. The deterioration of the USN’s seamanship skills is both evident and dangerous. There are two main areas of concern:

    1. The ships are poorly designed and the lessons learned during WWII of compartmentalization to contain damage are no longer incorporated into shipboard design. The loss of USS BONHOMME RICHARD due to fire while sitting at the pier in San Diego is just one example. The USN designs their ships now with habitability primary and fighting capabilities secondary. This probably accounts for more sailors being killed in shipboard mishaps than fifty years ago. Shipboard equipment is overly complex and what works in a research center ashore doesn’t work when operated by a poorly trained 19-year old at sea. Zumalt-class destroyers, the littoral combat ship, and the Ford-class carrier are the latest examples of USN design deficiencies.
    2. Naval personnel are more poorly lead, poorly trained, and politically motivated than before. To be promoted, USN sailors of all ranks are also judged by their community service participation. Because of the complexity of the shipboard equipment, the crew becomes little more than operators, and if a material casualty occurs at sea, the ship waits until the next port when the specialist comes aboard to effect the repair. Captains and Admirals are more managers than leaders and to think of the majority of the Flag rank as being members of the political establishment would be correct.

  3. Well something in my reading has become more clear. The sonar dome fell off completely and was in-tact… they don’t know where it’s gone either. What it sounds like to me is a technology transfer.

  4. Possibly they c ould have been a victim of some of that exotic technology that seems to be around. Possibly control was taken from them, or failed aboard ship.

  5. There are significant geomagnetic shifts taking place around, on, and in liquid and semi liquid sources in planet. One is the geomagnetic field. That general area, southeast Asia & Indian Ocean to include surrounding land masses are affected as there seems to be a merging of poles toward the Indian Ocean region as are general aviation and surface ship navigation systems affected. Compasses are not what they used to be or read out. Given the invention source of the compass, that little magnetometer one can carry around or the more sophisticated aboard ships at sea or in the air, later day Han Dynasty kin as well as 2nd and 1st century Han Dynasty kinfolk then probably know something is up with these fields and might even be able to distract other sovereigns from knowing the relationship far from their homelands. Just saying, . . . there seems to be more involved then just sleeping navigators, if they ever were asleep at the wheels. The field continues to unexpectedly fluctuate, too.

    A changing geomagnetosphere and possible changed undersea scapes or even planted [somethings] for snoops might affect strangers to the regions in the news.

  6. sthing i read swhere about chinese flatulating sub-traps, that float up from below. interesting idea as well.

  7. the navy will NEVER give out real info on their submarines. NEVER
    few things are as secret in the US military as the locations and activities of subs

  8. Thinking more about this, I really wonder if advanced technology craft such as UFOs and USOs and human black technology projects use pulsed light waves to navigate and avoid collisions.
    We know that UFOs and USOs emit very bright light as they cruise around both on land and in the water. Could they be using Photonar (laser light beams to detect other objects? like we use radar and sonar to detect other objects?)
    For example, Quantum Radar can theoretically detect objects with a far greater level of accuracy than conventional radar. It makes use of quantum illumination – the process of isolating pairs of entangled photons.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-43877682
    I do wonder if we already have the Starship USS Enterprise EM technology?

  9. This might be an overreliance on technology and these submarines were snooping around and were caught in the act and neutralized.

  10. At one point does the big “V” start to have a role – are those crew members, including officers, still clear headed, focused and able to react quickly?

    1. I was thinking the same thing. Crews blanking out briefly or suffering from all those spike proteins in their brain? Yes they get through the blood brain barrier easily.

  11. My car has a radar system that detects objects in its path and annoyingly decelerates the car.
    It’s likely the cause is navigation interference measures and deck officers who are low in skills and savvy.

  12. It’s a sad state of affairs, no matter how you slice it… My bet is on incompetence and/or covert war.

  13. anakephalaiosis

    Space reptilians infiltrate perception of reality, while genocide gremlins gaslight opposition, so that banksters can move financial empires.

    The 32-point compass is a means to navigate, not just spatially, but also temporally and linguistically, providing structure to lifespan.

    The supreme symbol of Genesis, in the Holy Writ, is the time-compass (卐).

    Navigare necesse est, vivere non est necesse.

    HOUSE OF CARDS

    Lizzy Lizard has widespread family,
    infiltrated in European ancestry,
    with slow Scandinavian
    blood reptilian,
    as weakest link of pedigree.

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/guxh06kpqxxk2o9/looney-tunes3.jpg

  14. Do nuclear powered submarines have optical / thermal / starlight / proximity cameras fitted to the outside of the hull? Fore and aft?
    If yes, then the Commodore and crew should have had ‘visual’ contact prior to the collision (as well as ‘audio’ sonar contact).
    No different to the Starship USS Enterprise. It deploys a range of EM tools for detecting other space craft (friend and foe).
    Please could someone answer this important question?

    1. RBG Santa Monica

      If the submarine was “running silent” active navigation measures like sonar would not be operating and the sub would not be able to emit any EM radiation. It would be navigating on charts at lower depths where there is not enough light for optical sensors. I don’t know if a mountain would have a noticeable thermal signature compared to the surrounding water.

    2. Optical is no good at any kind of depth and visibility conditions underwater are often poor.

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