The Website of Dr. Joseph P. Farrell



Well now there's talk all over the internet about pyramids in Antarctica. What appears to be causing all the discussion is this picture:

Frankly, I think we're looking at plain ordinary mountains here, albeit ones of unusual apparent symmetry. But suppose we ARE looking at pyramids (and I think the size of these mountains would preclude that, but that's just me), or, to put it differently, supposed there WERE pyramids in Antarctica? What would it mean?

Well, for one thing, it would confirm the speculations of many Atlantologists (including, incidentally, the Nazis), who believe that the ice-covered continent was in fact Atlantis, the continent literally being "sunk" under water, in this case, ice. The presence of such structures would raise the bar considerably not only for Atlantology but also for the possible motivations of the Nazi expedition in late 1938 and early 1939, and make it likely - if they discovered such structures during their aerial reconnaissance flights over the southern continent - that they decided to follow up with further investigations.

The reason any discovery of such structures on Antarctica would be significant is rather obvious, for the possibility would be quite strong that if they could be excavated (a mighty big if in Antarctica's case!) the sites might yield some significant records or artifacts of a lost human past. One might even speculate that the discovery of ancient records and technologies might be considered a top prize. Such a discovery could rationalize not only the curious Nazi expedition, but also the postwar attempts not only to internationalize the continent but to keep the curious visitor OUT of the continent.

While I remain skeptical at this moment, the story is nonetheless worth watching, providing, of course, that we don't get the usual mix of internet hysteria and hype (and yes, already the story has been predictably linked to extra-terrestrials and secret Nazi flying saucer research bases. Some people never learn....)

Joseph P. Farrell has a doctorate in patristics from the University of Oxford, and pursues research in physics, alternative history and science, and "strange stuff". His book The Giza DeathStar, for which the Giza Community is named, was published in the spring of 2002, and was his first venture into "alternative history and science".

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