transhumanism

MILITARY TO STUDY SYNTHETIC TELEPATHY

July 27, 2013 By Joseph P. Farrell

You can forget about those cyber-implants if you're worried about the transhumanist singularity. And you can quit worrying about the NSA reading your emails. And stop worrying about being chipped for biometric identification. Courtesy of a regular reader here, Ms. P.H., the latest technological plaything of the DARPAcrats and mad scientists is a little thing called "synthetic telepathy," and this comes to us from no less a source than phys.org:

Scientists to study synthetic telepathy

And as usual, we're being "sold" the technology by the usual method: it will help stroke victims and so on, and best of all, the whole process of reading your thoughts and communicating brain-to-bran is non-invasive:

The research could lead to a communication system that would benefit soldiers on the battlefield and paralysis and stroke patients, according to lead researcher Michael D’Zmura, chair of the UCI Department of Cognitive Sciences.Read more at: http://phys.org/news137863959.html#jCp

" The research could lead to a communication system that would benefit soldiers on the battlefield and paralysis and stroke patients, according to lead researcher Michael D’Zmura, chair of the UCI Department of Cognitive Sciences.

“'Thanks to this generous grant we can work with experts in automatic speech recognition and in brain imaging at other universities to research a brain-computer interface with applications in military, medical and commercial settings,' D’Zmura says.

"The brain-computer interface would use a noninvasive brain imaging technology like electroencephalography to let people communicate thoughts to each other. For example, a soldier would “think” a message to be transmitted and a computer-based speech recognition system would decode the EEG signals. The decoded thoughts, in essence translated brain waves, are transmitted using a system that points in the direction of the intended target."

Now, in a world where the NSA has been "revealed" to be spying on everyone, in a world with cell towers sprouting like weeds, it does not take much imagination to realize that one goal of such a capability would be to make an "imprint" of a given individual's EEGs, to modify their thoughts, read their thoughts.

And since I have raised the prospect of the Tower of Babel Moment of History in previous dialogues, it is conceivable that as the technology progresses, that it might be possible to engineer a general conformity to various memes that elites want to socially engineer.  There are already a variety of US patents for such devices, making the idea of schizophrenia a convenient psychiatric "cover" for the possibility that some people really are hearing others' voices in their heads. Such technologies would not be beyond the desires of the people behind MK-Ultra, Project Artichoke, and other intelligence agency black projects, to seek.

What I find interesting in the article is both its bland, disinterested tone, and the fact that this is being reported now, when, as I say, the patents have been around since the 1980s, if not before. US Patent # 3,951,134 was filed on April 20, 1976, and the title says it all: "Apparatus and Method for Remotely Monitoring and Altering Brain Waves." That was nearly 40 years ago...and with enough (black budget) money and mad scientist DARPAcrats....

See you on the flip side...

“Thanks to this generous grant we can work with experts in automatic speech recognition and in brain imaging at other universities to research a brain-computer interface with applications in military, medical and commercial settings,” D’Zmura says.

The brain-computer interface would use a noninvasive brain imaging technology like electroencephalography to let people communicate thoughts to each other. For example, a soldier would “think” a message to be transmitted and a computer-based speech recognition system would decode the EEG signals. The decoded thoughts, in essence translated brain waves, are transmitted using a system that points in the direction of the intended target.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news137863959.html#jCp