Babylon's Bankers

WHILE WE’RE ON THE SUBJECTS OF SPACE PROGRAMS, AND 3-D PRINTING

There is method to my madness, though sometimes it's not apparent, (especially to me). Over the past three days, I've blogged about apparently different and disconnected things:

  1. the Anglosphere's retrenchment into North America, signalled by (a) its sudden rapid development of indigenous energy resources, (b) its vast expansion of electronic eavesdropping and surveillance capability, which I submit is also a financial instrument, and (c) its push to rapidly introduce 3-d printing;
  2. the attempts to make US Apollo Moon landing sites national historical parks by legislative act of Congress, and the hidden corporate agendas, and agendas of archaeology and "artifact" protection(a rather intriguing "backdoor" statement with implications of its own);
  3. and finally, the cost effectiveness of 3-d printing.

In the past in various blogs I have suggested that there is a space aspect to this attempt to introduce 3-d printing into North America. Now, just as a reminder, though we have covered it before,  it's "official":

3-D printed rocket engines could make space travel cheaper

Cheaper rockets, in other words. But, as I've said before on this site, if you think rockets are the real goal here, I suspect that you're mistaken. Rockets would be cheaper, yes, but so would flying saucers.

Now, what this means is something else, namely, if indeed there is an attempt to retrench into North America underway by the Anglosphere oligarchs, and if indeed part of this effort is connected to covert agendas in space and other technologies that have not been revealed, and if 3-d printing is to be the mechanism driving manufacture of technologies coordinated by some government and-0r private center, then there will be a huge need for engineers.

And that, indeed, is what we see:

Engineers Get Rich as Talent War Heats Up

And lest you think all this 3-d printing stuff is hype, consider also the fact that patents on such devices are set to expire next year:

Get Ready: 3D Printing Will Explode Next Year, When Key Patents ExpireGet Ready: 3D Printing Will Explode Next Year, When Key Patents Expire

The context here? Well, as you're pondering all this, ponder also those attempts to make the Apollo landing sites historical parks, and ponder those billion-dollar Kennedy Bearer Bonds, with the Moon on the reverse, the shuttle, and the Lunar Excursion Module, and the collateralization of space...

See you on the flip side...

11 thoughts on “WHILE WE’RE ON THE SUBJECTS OF SPACE PROGRAMS, AND 3-D PRINTING”

  1. “The context here? Well, as you’re pondering all this, ponder also those attempts to make the Apollo landing sites historical parks, and ponder those billion-dollar Kennedy Bearer Bonds, with the Moon on the reverse, the shuttle, and the Lunar Excursion Module, and the collateralization of space…”

    I think its helpful at this point to revisit some of Dr.Farrells’s older blogs.
    “JAPAN: CONNECTING SOME DOTS, PART FOUR” and part six.

  2. To paraphrase Ex Sen. Tom Baker when did the Chinese, Indians, Russians know what was really on the Moon and when did they know it. Now Never A Strait Answer is in a rush to get back into real man space program at last. USSA has to revive it’s manufacturing base that it destroyed all these decades again reinventing the wheel as always. 3-D printing the meme to that end.

  3. Check out this 1971 dollar coin…

    Heads: Mr. IMC himself, Ike Eisenhower.

    Tails: An image of the Earth—specifically the U.S.S.A.—floats in the background of a perfectly innocent depiction of the Phoenix staking a founding claim to the lunar body.

    Call it in the air.

  4. On the subject of laser sintering 3D printers, from the Atlantic article: “ Because of its high resolution in all three dimensions, laser sintering can produce goods that can be sold as finished products.” That finished out of the machine claim is basically untrue, and it remains incredibly difficult to polish internal surfaces.

    Also the current good laser sintering machines are not simply a few tens of thousands of dollars–the ones for nylon retail for about a quarter million and are made in Germany and the ones for metal cost something like a million dollars. Will they get cheaper? Yes, will they be a 300usd desktop machine in 5 years? No. (Next paragraph explains the incompleteness of the Atlantic article.)

    Turns out the Atlantic isn’t writing about laser sintering of powder, but fusing of liquid plastic. The parts out of that system will still need to be polished and only then cast into metal–or used as molds for casting other plastic parts. Interesting that this is about to get cheaper, still far from mass production of difficult to machine parts.

    I think the laser sintering of powder is much more promising, because over the next 40 years they’ll work out how to using finer and finer particles and how to control the mixing things like electrically conductive inks into the mix. (Xerox is also making noises about working with particles suspended in a liquid, but that’s much closer to the powder work than the gel stuff the Atlantic suggests is such a big deal.) Now don’t mistake, I’d love to buy say a $1200 laser gel fusing machine in 12 months–but somehow it will take longer than that.

      1. Wasn’t Sagnac a guy who did an experiment that pretty much disproves some part of Special Relativity? Of course, the textbooks just call it the “Sagnac effect,” trying to end the discussion.

        1. bd–

          Now I’ll put this in the right place, because the webware can’t be bothered to remember to which I’m replying:

          Sagnac was one, but so were Michelson, Morley, Miller, Silvertooth, and likely many more I’ve not heard of. (Yes nearly every book is incorrect about the results of the originals, and the others, including Sagnac, are just getting the same results.)

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