Conspiracy Theater

WHAT’S REALLY GOING ON WITH THOSE EXPENSIVE AEGIS CLASS MISSILE ...

To say that the story of the USS John McCain's collision off of Singapore with a tanker was probably the biggest story of the last week would be putting it mildly(judging by the amount of articles and emails about it that I received), for it is now quite clear - at least in this author's opinion - that "something" is going on with the US Navy's Arleigh Burke class missile frigates, and it isn't good. It is, to be blunt, a major matter of the national security and defense. The real question is, what is going on, and who is really behind it? In this multi-part blog, I hope to outline at least a few of the interpretive options and "high octane speculations", though my list may not be your list, and your guess is as good as mine. And there's plenty of material to guess about.

First, the background. A few years ago, you'll recall, the USS Donald Cook was dispatched to duty station in the Black Sea in the wake of Mr. Putin's "annexation" of the Crimea, a move which the West interpreted as hostile, not withstanding the fact that Sevastopol was traditionally the base of the Russian Black Sea Fleet, and not withstanding the claims of local Russians of mistreatment from the US-backed coup government in Kiev. We heard lots about the violations of international law and what an outlaw Mr. Putin was, while no one in the West seemed to care that toppling legal governments - no matter how loathsome - was also a "violation of law." In any case, the Donald Cook arrived in the Black Sea, and we all know what happened next. An obsolescent Russian Sukhoi 24 fighter bomber approached the expensive Arleigh Burke class ship, and... all of its electronics died. Everything (or, so we're told). The problem was something that few noted at the time: while the electronics and computer systems appear to have been compromised, the ship was still under power and steerable. In any case, the crew tried to reboot the system while the Russian aircraft made no less than a dozen or so mock attack runs over the ship.

The Donald Cook beat a hasty retreat to the Romanian port of Constanza where, we were told, the ship was due for rest and minor repairs.

Uh huh.

At the time, I definitely concluded that something had happened to interfere with the ship's sophisticated systems, and that the Russian fighter was the immediate proximate cause. We'll be getting back to that in this multi-part blog.

The Donald Cook disappeared from the news radar for a couple of years, when it reappeared in the Baltic Sea for NATO exercises, when again a Russian Sukhoi 24 approached the ship, and the same thing more or less happened again. Now, my rule is, once is an accident, twice is a coincidence, and three or more is a pattern.

It became a pattern when the USS Fitzgerald was rammed by a freighter off the coast of Japan, with loss of life. Again, the questions raised far outstripped the answers given. How, with all that expensive equipment on the Fitzgerald, was another ship able to ram it? One would assume that the bridge watch would have noticed the ship, and its strange maneuvers, and taken evasive action, and also at least attempted to warn off the approaching freighter. We don't know, because we were not told. The lack of evasive action suggests that the crew had lost control of the ship by some means. At the time, I speculated that it might be some form of electronic warfare or pulse, but one reader here kindly mentioned that standard pulse weapons would black out all electronics, including steerage. The problem with that, as I see it, is that one would assume the US Navy would have certain electronic systems, including steerage, "hardened" against the possibility. Yet another possibility is a new type of electronic weapon that can target specific systems, perhaps by scanning for certain types of signals.

Fast forward to last week: On August 20 last week, the USS John McCain, yet another ship of this class, collided with a tanker while on a routine call to the port of Singapore, as reported here by RT:

5 injured, 10 missing after US destroyer USS John S McCain collides with oil tanker off Singapore

USS John McCain collides with oil tanker near Singapore–substantial damage and 10 sailors reported missing

Looking at this damage, I am struck by yet another coincidence: the damage to the vessel appears to be midships on the port side, just behind the superstructure of the ship, or, to be very "general" about it, behind the bridge. The Fitzgerald was struck on the starboard side, midships, just below and a little forward of the superstructure. Whether this is significant, I do not know. What is interesting is this statement:

The vessel arrived at Changi Naval Base in Singapore with significant damage and several flooded compartments.

Now, RT is stating that the McCain hit the tanker, but it would seem, given the nature of the damage, that the tanker hit the McCain, as was the case in the Fitzgerald incident, and this raises the question, once again, of why the McCain did not take evasive action nor attempt to warn off the tanker?  Are both incidents simply due to crew incompetence (always a possibility in dumbed-down America)? After all, with an increasingly stupid population with the attention span of gnats, it is the height of irrationality to expect a population that can barely read, much less write, to run a multi-million dollar sophisticated weapons system with anything approaching expertise. Education is a national security and defense issue.

The US Navy appears to be opting for some implied version of the "incompetence hypothesis" by dismissing the Commander of the 7th Fleet:

Navy Dismisses 7th Fleet Commander After Warship Accidents

Note the implied "incompetence hypothesis" in the following statement from the above-linked article:

A two-sentence statement issued by the Navy said Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, had relieved Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin "due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command."

The move follows four Navy accidents in the Pacific since late January, including two collisions that left sailors dead and missing.

"While each of these four incidents is unique, they cannot be viewed in isolation," Swift said late Tuesday.

He said the Navy will carry out a "deliberate re-set" of all its ships in the Pacific, focused on navigation, mechanical systems and bridge resource management. It will include training and an expert assessment of each ship.
(Emphasis added)

We note that the McCain managed to make it to port under its own power and steerage, recalling at least, in this regard, the Donald Cook, and we note that the Navy's statements is focusing on certain systems on the ship: Navigation, mechanical systems, and "bridge resource management." The Navy is also doubling down on the collisions being "unintentional" and due to incompetence:

The collision at daybreak in a busy shipping area tore a gaping hole in the McCain's left rear hull and flooded adjacent compartments including crew berths and machinery and communication rooms.

The cause of the collision has not been determined. The Navy previously said there was no evidence it was intentional, or that it was a result of sabotage or cyberintrusion.

The Navy last week said the Fitzgerald's captain was being relieved of his command and other sailors were being punished after poor seamanship and flaws in keeping watch were found to have contributed to its collision. An investigation into how and why the Fitzgerald collided with the other ship was not finished, but enough details were known to take those actions, the Navy said.

There were two lesser-known incidents in the first half of the year. In January, the USS Antietam guided missile cruiser ran aground near Yokosuka base, the home port of the 7th Fleet, and in May another cruiser, the USS Lake Champlain from the Navy's 3rd Fleet, had a minor collision with a South Korean fishing boat. (Emphasis added)

From a certain point of view, such dismissals are normal operating procedure while investigations are under way.

But I'm not buying the incompetence hypothesis for the simple reason that it has that "Admiral Kimmel" feel to it. Kimmel, of course, was the commanding flag officer at Pearl Harbor when it happened, and in spite of his repeated warnings to Washington to beef up Hawaii's air defenses and warning systems prior to the surprise Japanese attack on December 7 1941, Kimmel was made to take the fall and blame for the disaster.

So what are the other hypotheses and "high octane speculations" one might entertain as an interpretive template for all these strange events?

I contend that the Donald Cook incidents were a warning, and a message, a message which appears to be repeated with the ramming of the Fitzgerald and John McCain (talk about sending a message!). But we'll have to wait until tomorrow to entertain those speculations.

See you on the flip side...

 

27 thoughts on “ WHAT’S REALLY GOING ON WITH THOSE EXPENSIVE AEGIS CLASS MISSILE ...”

  1. John Lenkiewicz

    It’s obvious that something other than human error is involved. And the most obvious alternative is what Dr Farrell hinted at in his closing comments, that it was a message from somewhere to the US government. But isn’t it also possible that this is exactly what our government wants us to conclude. My outrageous speculation is that at some point the US is going to “reluctantly” admit that the collisions were some evil government’s attack on our freedom. This will be followed by a ramming of another US warship by a N Korean warship, thus justifying another retaliatory war to “protect American freedom from evil-doers”.

    Isn’t it just possible that the US was behind the ramming of it’s own ships (and the sacrifice of it’s own lives) in order to recreate a variation of the Tonkin Gulf Incident?

  2. America keeps threatening to go to war with Russia. My guess is that this Putin’s way of saying that if anyone wants to go to war against Russia, they better know how.

  3. “Now, RT is stating that the McCain hit the tanker…”

    Assuming this is not propaganda or spin, this statement could be because of the Very Formal rules around right-of-way. Even though the tanker rammed the McCain, ‘legally’ the McCain might have been seen as not giving the right-of-way required in the rulebooks…

    “…by dismissing the Commander of the 7th Fleet…”

    This is just the standard “someone must pay” or “someone must take the fall for this” response. That Admiral had absolutely nothing to do with setting bridge-watches or assuring crew watchfulness. He would even be seen as ‘intrusive’ if he tried to micro-manage what is naturally a ship captain’s duty. The Admiral was the chosen scape-goat to throw to the public…

    “The Navy is also doubling down on the collisions being ‘unintentional’ and due to incompetence…”

    Naturally. To do otherwise would be to acknowledge a gaping hole (pun intended) in USN defenses…

  4. Our days of commanding the Pacific are quickly coming to an end in a “plausibly deniable” fashion, it would seem. The wholesale destruction of fast moving, agile, high tech ships with slow moving tankers is quite innovative. It points out the vulnerability and incompetence in a manner which makes us look ludicrous.

  5. I’m thinking if we have a bunch of broken ships we’ll need more money to make new and better ships. Breakaway civ black ops money stimulating the Fed.

    1. RBG Santa Monica

      That’s interesting.
      “Remember The Maine” that blew up in Havana Harbor in 1898. That ship was obsolete and the Navy was happy to be rid of it.

  6. Robert Barricklow

    McCain is living up to her namesake in the senate who was at the bottom of his academy class, and at the tip top of stupid preventable accidents causing deaths.

  7. Robert Barricklow

    Rather than a “hot war”; the gods[private power with more money than gods] are being “tested”. Or, I should say, their instruments of in st1 tu tion al Madness[WAR] are having their day in court[battlefield accidents/acts of (other) gods].

  8. Both the Fitzgerald and the McCain appeared to be dead in the water when they were hit. Note, that there are no scrape marks from a collision with a much slower vessel. This would be comparable to a dolphin being broadsided by a whale. Ain’t (a not) gonna happen if there is an ounce of mobility in the targeted vessels. Note, both were hit in the same place. Interesting coincidences and very implausible if either ship were under power.

  9. Robert Barricklow

    Oops, that arrow that flies in the dead of night[self censorship]

    Ironically, it was used this way….
    in st1 tu tion al MADNESS!

    1. Robert Barricklow

      That arrow that flies in the dead of night because no one sees it[self-censorship].
      Unfortunately, this is replete throughout the 21st century, written/oral; from white lies to hard core truths[offensive], some deemed worthy of arrest[in countries where certain histories CANNOT be EVEN questioned?

  10. Robert Barricklow

    Rather than a hot war; the gods[more money than god] are being tested. Or, I should say, their instruments of institutional madness[WAR] are having their day in court[battlefield accidents].

  11. Phil the Thrill

    The Navy talks about its loss of confidence in the “ability to command,” and I suggest that this is actually “command of the narrative.” Slightly off-topic, but I know our good doctor can sympathize with an author who is experiencing a campaign to derail book sales. There is a newly-released young adult fiction novel called “Hand book for Mor tals” (dancing with the mod bot) which is currently being suppressed–it took me all of three minutes to see how that is obvious; the NYT has bumped the book off its best seller list due to “volume buyers” (as if Heil-ery’s tripe doesn’t benefit from those), and ammi zon has stuffed the book’s page with negative reviews (the vast majority of which are not verified purchases).
    I’ve not read the book, only a sample of it. A young witch grows into her powers and falls in love, would seem to be a fair synopsis. Yet, as I write, we see a campaign being waged to control the narrative regarding this book’s apparent popularity.
    Glad to see you back in action, Doc.

  12. There are two possibilities either the military is using white elephant technology. Or there are forces in the shadows sabotaging and reducing the military to useful idiots and puppets for their own twisted ends.

  13. I don’t know if you saw the follow-up ZH article about the incident, but after the Navy called a full halt to 7th fleet operations, Navy investigators put out that they ARE entertaining the possibility that these rammings were caused by “hacks.” Meaning that the Chinese are probably using their back-doors in the electronics purchased by the US military (an old adage about selling the rope to hang yourself comes to mind) and/or they are spoofing the military’s GPS system.

    Even more interesting than this pretty obvious suspicion is a comment by someone on the ZH comments thread for the McCain ramming who related info from a very close relative in the Navy. It certainly sounds legit and is quite alarming if true:

    “[His ship] was recently in that area [where the McCain was rammed] when something very disconcerting happened. The US armed forces have a ‘safe in/safe out’ code that is changed every day for every aircraft. This is NOT their normal identification beacon but a special code that tells either the ship/base that the aircraft approaching is ‘safe’ to approach… Recently, an aircraft that was not part of the US/Nato fleet, approached with a correct ‘safe in/safe out’ code. No hostile acts were made, but it was abundantly clear that the Chinese had broke our codes…”

    In other words, USN security has been breached at a fundamental level. They don’t have control of their ships, their communications or their surrounding airspace. They’re sitting ducks and 2 of 7 crucial Aegis cruisers have already been put out of commission — by tanker rammings of all things (as if a sloth attacked a cheetah). They must be sweating bullets right now.

    1. No Basta, I’m pretty sure they’re more concerned with the wonderful, freak trans genders and who is going to pay for their thousands of dollars of surgery. We’re no longer a fighting force thanks to the former freaks in the white house (or should I say black house). I’m sick from what they have done to this country while everyone has remained mute for fear of being called a racist.

      1. Phil the Thrill

        C’mon, Don. Obamalamadingdong is half black. Furthermore, he and W are blood cousins, as well. Dingdong and his tranny husband are no weirder than Graham and McCain and whatever those two do with pretty boys behind closed doors.

        1. Yeah, those two are a whole new set of freaks. But don’t forget Maxine and the rest of her ilk from another planet. lol

    2. Basta, that sounds like the IFF (Identification, Friend or Foe) code. I wonder if the Chinese research on quantum computing has been put to work in practice. I remember reading that code-cracking was a primary reason for the quantum computing race. If the Chinese can crack the IFF code in, say, a half hour, the USN (and US military) will have to revise that whole system’s refresh-timing…

    3. RBG Santa Monica

      It is my understanding inside information would be required to crack those safe in/ safe out codes, just as an actual captured Enigma machine was needed to finally crack to the German enigma code. I don’t know how quantum computing changes the equation, but hacked hardware from Chinese manufacturers used in the ship systems could suffice as a back door.

  14. We talked about Dr Peter David Beter in last night’s vidchat. Here is a link where he talks about Russia’s excellent weapons, in 1980! He refers to other of his “audio letters” with more information. Space war, gold, the secret government. Some of his letters are on youtube also. http://www.peterdavidbeter.com/docs/all/dbal58.html
    This is the main page for Beter: http://www.peterdavidbeter.com/docs/all/dbaltpcs.html
    Edgar Cayce said “out of Russia will come hope”. I think they have been saving the world from the USA for a long time.

    1. Thank you for the links on this one. Has anyone vetted this resource? How reliable is the data he cites historically? I may be spending time on this site in the near future, but he reminds me a little of Sherman Skolnick–another resource whose intelligence has proven remarkably resilient up until his death.

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