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FORMER JAPANESE FOREIGN MINISTER TARO KONO….

As you can tell, many of the articles I received the previous week from readers of this website were about geopolitics, and that's true of today's short article from Sputnik about Taro Kono, former Japanese Foreign, and Defense, Minister:

https://sputniknews.com/20210910/japans-kono-says-important-to-reach-peace-deal-with-russia-1088943298.html

As noted in the article, Kono stands a good chance to end up as the leader of Japan's Liberal Democrat party, and hence, stands a good chance of ending up as the next Japanese prime minister. What's significant about this is that Mr. Kono appears to have made it a priority to conclude a formal peace treaty with Russia and to reach some sort of formal understanding of the Russian portion of the island of Hokaido(Sakhalin) seized and occupied by the Soviet Union at the end of World War Two.  It might be recalled that the Soviet Union and Japan were not at war until the very final weeks of the Pacific War when Stalin finally declared war on Japan, and invaded Japanese occupied Manchuria and Hokaido/Sakhalin Island.

This territory has thus been the sticking point between the two countries keeping them from concluding a formal peace since World War Two. Former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was able to conclude some trade deals with Mr. Putin by simply by-passing the issue, though it might be recalled that both leaders effectively agreed to make the Russian portion of Hokaido/Sakhalin a free-trade zone, and travel restrictions to Japanese citizens were lifted.

Perhaps Mr. Kono has just signaled his willingness to formalize these provisions, perhaps not. They have been in place since Mr. Putin and Mr. Abe agreed to them, and thus far, I'm not aware of any incidents or complaints by either party, which suggests that those agreements may have been a "trial run" to see how they worked before being formalized.

As I've pointed out many times before on this website when dealing with this topic is that what is certain is that both Russia and Japan need to conclude a formal peace for the simple reason that they both need further deals. Russia wants to build out its Siberian infrastructure to make its abundant resources a more integral part of the Russian, and Eurasian, economy. High speed rail upgrades to the Trans-Siberian railroad, and the capital to do it, are both essential to Russia for that project to succeed.  The problem for Russia has been and continues to be its reliance on China both for the high speed rail technology and the capital to do it.  China is at best a problematic ally for Russia. And you'll notice, the Trans-Siberian continues to lumber on without Chinese investment or high speed rail technology.

Enter Japan: Japan of course has the high speed rail technology, and it also has the capital. What it does not have is a secure supply of energy and food resources, with much of its energy coming through waters easily interdictable by Communist China. What Russia does have is abundant energy, right next door, so to speak, to Japan.

In short, the two countries need each other, and Mr. Kono has just signaled that a formal peace with Russia would be a high priority for any government that he might head.  And trade deals with Russia could go a long way to revive the moribund Japanese economy.

In addition, with the Afghanistan fiasco and America's geopolitical decline, the geopolitical circumstances have changed dramatically since Mr. Abe's occupancy of the Japanese premiership. All of this signals that Mr. Kono might be successful where his predecessors were not.  But in any case, over the next couple of years, watch Japan...

See you on the flip side...

 

28 thoughts on “FORMER JAPANESE FOREIGN MINISTER TARO KONO….”

  1. Russia and Japan had a peace treaty. Stalin promised Roosevelt at Yalta in February 1945 that Russia would attack Japan 90 days after Germany surrendered. (See: Japan – Soviet Relations on Wikipedia) In May 1945 Russia started moving troops across Siberia and attacked August 8, 1945, 2 days after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.
    Japan surrendered unconditionally in September 1945. Initially major reforms were started in Japanese society like the breakup of the industrial concerns (Mitsubishi), land reform, courts, labor unions, women’s rights. The Japanese people loved it, most of them anyway, not the families involved with industries and the military. In 1947 MacArthur, the military governor of Japan, rolled back the reforms, too communistic. By the time of the Korean War the U.S. was suggesting that Japan be allowed to rearm. Believe it or not this went over like a lead balloon with the majority of the Japanese people. They were left treading a fine line during the Cold War, needing U.S. protection against the enemies of the U.S. (the Communist Block) and trying to have some say so in their own destiny. The U.S. continued to have military bases in Japan, and by 1960 that issue was the reason Eisenhower had to cancel his stop to Japan on his world wide tour of peace or good will because of demonstrations. The American people heard “Communist agitators” kept Ike from landing. In reality the Japanese were fed up with being pawns in the Cold War game America was playing.
    Ike had made it to Spain where he was pictured in a love embrace with Franco. This kept Franco in power and U.S. military bases in Spain possibly with nuclear weapons that we were moving around the globe. Back in Japan we had allowed the industrial concerns to remain intact and discouraged labor unions. The war power families were allowed to have influence. A famous picture is of a young man from one of the war families plunging a samurai sword into the abdomen of another man on a stage during a political rally. That young man is now the hero of one of the groups that approves of the recent attempt to take over the U.S. Capitol building. Americans during the 1950’s were told they are the greatest. Fed a steady diet of propaganda by LIFE magazine that had a last page which always had an unusual picture, it reminds me of the fold up page on the back of MAD MAGAZINE. We are reaping what we sowed, that’s what the world thinks. And we think they get what they deserve. Ike, who was MacArthur’s aide de camp and stood next to him when he ordered the Army to attack the Bonus Marchers in 1932 was a fraud. Just like J. Edgar Hoover. Truth, justice and the American way. OK sounds good.
    America does not really have any real allies anymore and the Japanese were fed up with us many decades ago. What’s left for us. No industrial power. Apparently Covid is keeping our main economic base from functioning, the bars and restaurants. We need to re think our own destiny because from here on out it’s playing catch up and maybe court Japan to no buddy up with Russia.

    1. Karl Marx is blood related to Rottenchild, and they connect through the synagogue, that has open door, into Masonic lodges, that are Jesuit mafia fronts, controlled by papacy.

      ClA, as the Jesuit apron, does media spin, to instigate wars, here, there and everywhere.

      The term is “divide et impera”, and papacy has had its Jesuit moles, around the globe for centuries.

      Communists are globalist minions, working for Wall Street, in secret, in Marx-Rottenchild agreement.

  2. You confuse the Kuri islands with Sakhalin Joseph but the real enemy in the shadows I doubt is China. It is more likely the old nemesis of both Russia and China the British Empire and through it whoever is the real power in London the Venician Republic of the north.

  3. The demographics of each country, Russia & Japan, are important to consider also. This SARS-CoV-2 business dealt each significant blows to their already troubled populations. Neither are those radiation effects of past incidents over for each.

    Should Japan ever lose its sovereignty due to its waning population numbers their island nation could be seen as another resource by Moscow. Should Russia’s population suffer the same fate of population decline, they have additional time zones to manage (but by whom).

    In any case, resolving past conflicts is in each other’s best interest when one considers a looming thug nearby just waiting to resolve matters a different way for each.

    1. The Asian side of the Bering Strait is in concord. The open question is on the American side.

      Moving focus, away from the transatlantic, will sever connection, between greater and lesser Satan.

      Donald Trump’s roller-coaster in Alaska is Pope Satan’s nightmare. Empires fall apart on the steppe.

      Mandarins with MAGA-hats are a Chinese century.

  4. Pagans have flooded over the U.S. borders and the ruins of American heritage stand in porous edifice. Corrupt politicians grow more and more alien to those sophisticated enough to step away from the radioactive, noxious fumes of a rapid degradation of what society used to be. Ground zero California is the disguised asylum that portends the undulation that will ripple out to all eventually. Perhaps bleakness is a survival method but is there wisdom in the lifestyle of a barnacle? Should we all construct storm shelters close by and keep vigilant ears open for sirens and beware the coming storm?

    1. Robert Barricklow

      Or, as the late deadpan comic, Norm Macdonald quipped in 1996,
      “Well, it is finally official”, Macdonald said after Simpson’s acquittal.
      Murder is legal in California”.

      Add on 15 years of exponential insanity.

  5. Everyone is interested in a Bering tunnel. America wants a ticket to Europe, and Asia wants a freight route.

    That is where Donald Trump comes into the picture, and mandarins start wearing MAGA-hats.

    Doctor Who has invaded Australia, to establish happy hour for tradies. Duck-beavers are welcome!

    AUSSIE TRADIES 2

    Doctor Who, riding with secretary,
    did some overtime industry,
    that nature prescribes
    for growing tribes,
    in full moon nocturnal activity.

    Original British Law, in natural symbols:
    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/pnz9jpb73u1gfla/druidry-for-dummies.pdf

  6. Japan is in a better position than the US because they still have an economy that makes things, and not just a fraudulent financial system and a gutted industrial network.

        1. An airport transit, via Japan, to connect, with the Trans-Siberian Railway, has limited freight capacity, though.

          Besides, airports are not everyone’s cup of tea. Grassroots prefer train travel. Not everyone wants to be jetset.

          William Gilpin’s continental swing door, through Bering Strait, works both ways, for populace tidal waves.

          Donald Trump’s roller-coaster:

          https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/07/superhighway-bering-strait-new-york-paris/397370/

      1. Where once ‘Made in Japan’ had its ups and downs for quality issues that has changed but so is decoupling, re-tooling, and getting to work in the US changing. And changing fast with changes to suit additional threats.

        1. I hear it and am waiting to see it.
          Still getting harder to get parts.
          Finding companies buying used company cars for their on the road employees. New cars are impossible to get.

          1. Robert Barricklow

            What do you get when you cross an Anaconda w/a VW Bug?
            I don’t know, but you’ll have a hell of a time finding parts!

          2. @zendogbreath – Your right about the “parts” issue. It’s a major supply line matter. Nearly every routing type air, land, and sea are like sluggish arteries. Whether constricted by narrowing (supply checks & pandemic related) or greatly reduced from lack of repairs, weather related flooding, altered commodities getting into the supply chain to markets, or now, the fuel issue from corruptive policies, all areas are having an effect on pricing, shelf inventories, and ordering for re-supply. Hope you get your parts sooner than later. If you get a chance strike up a conversation with your delivery agent for those “what’s up” questions about how things are on their receiving end for distribution since they’re the messenger with the goods in these interesting times..

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