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WHAT’S UP WITH THE CALIFORNIA DROUGHT? UNUSUAL PICTURES FROM RT, ...

April 22, 2015 By Joseph P. Farrell

Normally I don't do stories about the weather at all on this website, except when it's so bizarrely strange that it's unavoidable or, as in the case of my 2012 weather report, when the memes running around the alternative community were so hysterically...er... hysterical that they could only have been dealt with by a bit of hysteria of my own (See NEW SITE FEATURE: WEEKLY GIZADEATHSTAR WEATHER). But for anyone living in California and the severe persisting draught there, things aren't so funny.

Indeed, last year when I spoke at the San Mateo Secret Space Program Conference, two friends of mine and I had the opportunity to drive from southern California to the Silicon Valley area, by way of California's rich agricultural belt in the San Jaquin Valley.

What we saw stunned all of us, particularly my one friend who is a native Californian, and me. In my case, I have to explain with a bit of personal anecdotal information. When I was a boy, my mother had family in Pomona, one of those meaningless lines on the map in the urban sprawl that is the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area. Of course, I can understand the mentality: Pomonans are from Pomona, and Pasadenans are from Pasadena. It would be like confusing Soho for Kensington, if one were a Londoner, or Queens with (perish the thought) the Bronx if one were a New Yorker. But for a Midwesterner like me, cities, towns, villages, etc, are always to be separated from other cities, towns, villages, by intervening rural areas - farms, ranches, woods, forests, hills, and so on. This makes things much easier to keep straight in one's head. Sooner or later, Californians, Londoners, and New Yorkers recognize the Genius of Midwestern Organization. (I won't even begin to attempt to describe my being lost on the London tube. I'd still be there, had it not been for a kindly British lady who held my hand, and helped me negotiate my way to where I needed to go.)

All lightness aside, however, because my mother had family in California, as a  boy, our family used to travel to the southern California on a few occasions, and while driving around southern California sight-seeing, I remember the southern San Jaquin Valley as being a lush agricultural garden, from one mountain range to the other. It was like being in my home state of South Dakota, or Iowa, but instead of just corn fields, there were orchards, flowers, orange groves, soy beans, corn, you name it, it was an unimaginable cornupcopia of colors and green.

But what we saw as we drove across the southern San Jaquin Valley on our way to the conference stunned all of us, particularly my native Californian friend, and me, who have vividly different memories comparied to what we now saw: most of the fields were fallow, and had apparently been so for some time. A few orange groves. A flower plantation here and there, but for the most part, empty fields, crumbling irrigation ditches.  Sad, boarded up farmhouses.

My friend and I were truly shocked, and he took pictures to document the whole sad sight. It was as if all of East River in South Dakota (the half of the state east of the Missouri river), had been turned into a dust bowl overnight.

We heard the usual explanations from Californians: government incompetence (after all, the state has been a one party state for some time, and is likely to remain so as it races to become the "Cuba west" franchise); enviro-fascists, government regulation, Sacramento bureaucrats, and in my instance, I heard one or two angry people on a chance encounter one day, blaming Governor Schwarzennegger and Governor Brown (depending on their party political affiliation, of course), for the whole catastrophe. There were the usual complaints about too many (or too few) illegal aliens, and on and on the litany went.

All of it may be true to some degree, and I have no quibble with those who maintain that much of it is due to the political radicals in a state which seems to produce a bumper crop of them every year. But still... could all that incompetence and poltical radicalism and enviro-fascism account for this... what was before our very eyes? Something was unsettling about it, and wasn't being fully explained. I still, to this day, find it profoundly unsettling and disturbing, and have never quite found the words to describe not only what I saw but how I felt seeing it and feel remembering it, compared to what I remember of it as a boy.

...then this week, Mr. D.S. sent me this very intriguing, and highly suggestive, article that appeared in RT (yes, RT is running articles about the California draught that I doubt we'll see in the Sacramento Bee):

'The blob' in Pacific Ocean might be to blame for California drought, erratic US weather - studies

Notice that this study is being conducted by American scientists, and notice the tags for the article here: "global warming." Yes, the California drought is being served up as evidence of "climate change". No surprise there, and the Koolaid drinkers in Sacramento are  probably filling their cups with the nonsense as southern California's agriculture blows away in the wind.

But there's a cautionary note here in the RT article from the very scientist conducting the study:

"Bond told Science Daily that climate change was not likely the cause of the blob, though the weather patterns it produced do foreshadow what global warming has in store."

So what are we dealing with, beyond the usual scientific double-talk? Note the consistency of the pattern, and even the shape of "the blob" of water:

"The blob -- measuring about 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) in diameter and 300 feet (91 meters) deep -- is currently positioned against the West Coast. It is about 2 to 7 degrees Fahrenheit (1 to 4 degrees Celsius) above normal average temperature. Climate scientist Nick Bond was first to call the warm weather anomaly "the blob" nearly a year ago.

"'In the fall of 2013 and early 2014 we started to notice a big, almost circular mass of water that just didn't cool off as much as it usually did, so by spring of 2014 it was warmer than we had ever seen it for that time of year,'said Nick Bond of the University of Washington-based Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, a joint research center of the school and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

...

"'Lately this mode seems to have emerged as second to the El Niño Southern Oscillation in terms of driving the long-term variability, especially over North America,' Hartmann said, according to Science Daily.

"The cold winter on the East Coast in 2014-2015 can also be attributed to the high-pressure system back on the West Coast, Hartmann has argued.

"'It's an interesting question if that's just natural variability happening or if there's something changing about how the Pacific Ocean decadal variability behaves,' Hartmann said. 'I don't think we know the answer. Maybe it will go away quickly and we won't talk about it anymore, but if it persists for a third year, then we'll know something really unusual is going on.'"

In other words, the scientists are suggesting that we're looking at a "long cycle" of some sort, but even then, "if it persists for a third year, then we'll know something really unusual is going on."

It's that "something really unusual is going on" that is, in fact, what I suspect is going on. That brings us to my high octane speculation. Suppose you have a weather modification technology that could raise and lower regions of pressure in the atmosphere... technologies like HAARP for instance, which can do exactly that,as described in the relevant patents. Suppose you then park said region over a certain place for a prolonged period of time. Suppose this then produces a drought in a once rich agricultural region, driving farmers out of business, and the value of their property down. Suppose too that you had invented a new form of "financial instrument" called weather derivatives (and, while we're at it, weather "futures" as a kind of derivative of "commodity futures" like "orange futures" and so on). And suppose you intended to use this technology to force small farmers out of business, buy their land cheap, and then "turn the button" to "rain." But you'd want to cloak your activity by having a bunch of nutcases blocking the construction of new water resevoirs and irrigation systems for "environmental" reasons to preserve This Speckled Whatever or That Fork-Tailed Fluke," You'd want to breed just enough political corruption and one-party rule and radicalism as you could, to mask the whole geoengineering scheme. And then, when the land was yours, you'd turn against your radical regulating bureaucratic friends in the most abrupt and brutal fashion possible, and throw them out of office and out of their jobs. (They call it "austerity" in Europe.) They have served their purpose.

Is this scenario and speculation wild and wacky?  To be sure, but no wilder or wackier than the goony radicals from the state's metropolitan areas who are regulating California into oblivion. Why am I confident enough to even mention it? Well, for one very simple reason: weather systems move... Water in oceans moves. But the Soviet Socialist Republic of California does not move, and it is in that bizarre combination and coincidentum oppositorum that such scenarios are born. This one will march on until the wealth transfer is completed, the radicals paid, and then cashiered.

See you on the flip side...